Traveling with Diabetes
November 27, 2013 – 3:18 pm | No Comment

I’ve travelled several times each month this year and it’s given me some lessons:
I’ve learned that I get motion sickness on planes and cannot travel without taking Dramamine.  I tried to forego it once and …

Share
Read the full story »
Diabetes and work

Issues at the workplace and tips for handling them

Diabetes and relationships

Info on dating diabetics, dating, friendship, and family

Diabetes and your mind

How your mind affects your diabetes and what you can do to make the best of it

Diabetes and your body

Body image and issues, exercise and diabetes

Diabetes and Diet

Home » Diabetes and Diet, Diabetes and your mind, featured, For type 1 diabetics, For type 2 diabetics, headline, product review

Emotional Eating with Diabetes Book Review

Submitted by on February 5, 2013 – 8:38 am2 Comments

LIP EEWD Emotional Eating with Diabetes Book Review

Emotional Eating with Diabetes is Ginger Vieira’s 2nd book.  It tackles a subject all too familiar to people with diabetes and perhaps, not acknowledged enough by everybody else.

I’ve blogged about my struggles with food but not in great detail.  So I want to share my emotional eating story.

I’m a really emotional person and someone who has lived with type 1 for over 18 years (and through childhood and teenage years) so put that together and add in some 1st world body issues and you have someone who can review this book from a very personal place of experience.

And while I think I’ve got a good grip on my emotional eating issues (they don’t resurface often), I’m like an alcoholic in the sense that I need consistent reminders to stay on the right path and out of the dark side.  I really benefited from reading this book.  And I think I’ll read it every single year from now on for support.

It started when I was 12 and had only been living with type 1 for a year.  I would beg my mom for gum at the grocery store and then sell each piece at school for 10 cents, which I’d then pool together to buy an alternate lunch at school each day-a Little Debbie oatmeal cookie or fudge round.  I hated diabetes and the rules that came from my doctors so much that I was going to spite them any way I could.  So I ate what I wasn’t supposed to for lunch.

Then I started sneaking in candy bars and granola bars when no one was looking just to eat what diabetes wouldn’t let me eat.  (Do remember, this was before fast acting and 20-some hour insulin so back then we did have to abide by some rules that we don’t have any longer.)

I would binge and then feel like the worst person in the world.  And I developed a cycle of rebellion mixed with self-hate and a neglect for self-respect (ironically something I was all for in other manifestations).  People didn’t know I had a problem because I hid it.  And that was probably the first sign of a problem for me.

My health suffered, my weight went up, I had a hard time keeping up with such a destructive way of living.

Eventually (after years of hard work), I began to enjoy eating healthy and learned how to treat myself in a respectful way when it came to food.  And because food matters so much in diabetes, my health improved dramatically-no, my life improved dramatically.

If this sounds at all like you or you want to stop feeling obsessive about food, get this book.  It’s written in a straight forward but friendly way that will acknowledge all your fears and anxieties and help you through them.  This book will give you a guided path to where you want to be and show you how to be kind to yourself along the way.

I agree that the “can’t eat that” mentality is harmful. Ginger stresses that we make our own decisions and instead of telling ourselves we can’t have something, we either choose to or choose not to. And that’s how I do now with bread, rice, and pasta and other heavy carbs. I choose not to have them but I know that if I want them, I can have them. There is a difference between enjoying chicken and veggies  and eating that same dish while staring longingly at the rice side that is “forbidden”. Our minds are very susceptible to this kind of pressure and they are bound to crack.

Every now and then I eat my favorite food-ice cream, and I eat it really slowly, savoring every bite.  And I remember how I used to eat it so fast my tongue would burn and I would ask myself “What are you doing, you’re not even enjoying this?!”  That’s when I realize I’ve come a long way.  And yes, it took baby steps, the way Ginger describes in her book, but eventually we can get where we’re meant to be.  And the journey is so worthwhile.  This book is succinct, kind, and best of all I believe it’s effective.

I strongly recommend it.

Buy it here wlEmoticon smile Emotional Eating with Diabetes Book Review

share save 120 16 Emotional Eating with Diabetes Book Review

2 Comments »

  • Stacey D. says:

    Thank you for sharing your review of Ginger’s book and more importantly your own story. I plan on giving this a read as I feel that I have some issues I need to address, more recently. I think it’s even harder on those of us who grew up with the “rules” of diabetes from so long ago to have a healthy relationship with food. I am glad for you that you were able to (mostly) overcome your issues.

  • Laura P. says:

    Great book review and thank you for sharing your personal story. Thank you so much. I too have come so very far, but still struggle with it. Not like I used to, which is a miracle in itself. I will definitely get this book.

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.