Category Archives: Diabetes and your body

No D Day Post-My Top 10 Beauty Products List

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You might hate me for this.  I might hate me for this.  But you know what?  I think most of us like beauty products.  It’s a billion dollar industry in the US alone and I’m not the only one buying ;)  So today for No D Day, where we don’t talk about our chronic condition, I’m going to stroll down vanity lane.  Don’t forget, I’m from Venezuela-land of what I like to call “Beauty Effort”.  In other words, people aren’t more attractive there-they just spend more time and effort making the most of what they’ve got.

So here is a list of my top 10 beauty products put together through countless, shameless hours of testing:  (share yours in the comments please I’m always on the lookout and ready to learn more!)

10.  Round boar bristle brush.  I don’t care so much about the brand name I just care that it’s boar bristle and easy to hold.  Works like a charm and is gentle on the scalp and distributes oils to the rest of the hair for maximum shine and hair health.  The round aspect is great for volume while blow drying hair.

9.  Lip Stain- Revlon makes a great one.  It’s a nice way to perk up lip color and make it look natural-looks like you just ate some strawberries!  It also feels like it’s not there which is a great plus.  I also like the natural, matte look of it.  Sometimes the shininess of gloss is tiring.

8.  Maybelline Color Tattoo.  Creamy eye shadow that doesn’t budge for over 24 hours.  Comes in the most gorgeous colors.  Perfect for Fall.  (Yes, I sound like a cheesy Allure columnist, oh well).

7.  Lacquer Liner 24 hour L’Oreal Infallible.  Amazing.  Seriously.  It’s the only eye liner that I’ve ever described as “success!”.  No smudging, no leaking into the eye.  And the brush is pure genius.  I’m really lousy with having a steady hand and even I manage this like a pro.  The black is really harsh so don’t be afraid of the slate or bronze-they are very bold and pretty but great for those of us who are no longer 21 years old.

6.  Neutrogena Make Up Remover Cleansing Towelettes.  I’m lazy about washing my face at night (how to keep water from going all over the sink, down one’s neck and elbows is beyond me) so I use these wipes.  They work so well and I think they help exfoliate, too.  I keep one corner of the wipe clear each night to use in the morning when the little remaining eye make up has smeared down under my eyes.  Ya know, just so I stay classy.

5.  Bronzer.  Used correctly, it works miracles.  Figure out how to contour your unique face shape.  This stuff is excellent when you feel pale and sickly, to just bring back some glow.  But don’t over do it.

4.  St. Tropez Self Tanning Mouse.  I don’t use it often so it lasts me well over a year (which is good because it’s the most expensive thing on this list).  It’s awesome though.  It looks great on all skin types-even really dark skinned girls, because it gives a warm and healthy glow.  It’s probably carcinogenic so I don’t recommend using it all the time.  But for example, for an event where there is a dress involved, this stuff makes getting ready seem more effortless.

3.  L’Oreal Ellnet Satin Hairspray.  It’s not cheap, it’s not found in small towns sometimes, but it’s great stuff because you can brush your hair after applying it and have hold with neat looking hair that still moves a plenty!  Or you can do what I do and just use it to hold hair’s volume after a blow dry.  (I’ve lost lots of my hair over the past decade so this makes up for it!)

2.  Mascara.  Ya know, I don’t have a favorite brand.  I suppose I haven’t found it.  But, I don’t go without it very often, it’s just too fun.  In fact, I try a different brand every few months just for kicks.

1.  Lip liner.  If you’re like me, your lips are on the thin side.  Which is fine except mine are also not very defined and tend to just blend into my skin.  SO, nude lip liner it is.  Revlon Colorstay Natural to be exact.  It really makes a difference.  Just be sure not to go outside the lip line.  That look isn’t in and never will be.  And my dear fellow Latinas…please stop the light lipstick and dark liner thing.  Just stop.

Last but not least, a few lessons I’ve learned the hard way:

1.  Don’t over pluck brows.  Magazines constantly reiterate this for a reason-we all need the reminder.  Leave well enough alone!  Brows are most gorgeous when their natural shape is retained because that natural shape was made by nature for your face and your face alone.

2.  If you don’t like wearing make up, don’t wear it!  I say cheers to you, sister and don’t even begin to apologize.  Just do me a favor and be sure to moisturize.

3.  Similarly, if you do love wearing make up, don’t be ashamed.  One of the most calming things for me is to put on make up.  It’s like a creative outlet.  There are so many colors and techniques!

4.  There are a lot of rules out there.  Break em’.  Wear white after labor day, red lipstick to the grocery store, and no make up to a party.  If you’re happy with it, nothing else matters.

5.  A way to save skin from aging is to stay moisturized. And as much as I like to use natural products, unfortunately coconut oil or organic lotions don’t do much for my scaly dry skin so I use Vaseline Intensive Care.  That said, if coconut oil works for you, awesome.

Last comment:  Go out and learn what colors, make up techniques, hair color, and jewelry flatter you.  It’s a great way to love exactly who you are because it’s about supporting what you already have instead of trying to cover it up or completely change it.

My favorite website that has free info on how to figure out your best colors, make up techniques, hair color, jewelry, style, hats, etc, is thechicfashionista.com.  There you can get tons of guidance for free and take some time to appreciate your unique sense of beauty.

This post wasn’t so shallow, was it?

Read more No D Day posts by clicking here!

The Annual Sigh of Relief

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It’s Fab Friday and part of discovering self love is dragging ourselves to the doctor for important things such as:

Each year I get an eye exam.  And every time I go I’m anxious about the results.

I happen to be SO “uh oh” broke right now, but I’m nevertheless enjoying the finer things in life-like great eye health.

My doctor asked me to remind her how long I’ve had type 1.  I told her it would be 18 years this November.  She said, “hmm…wouldn’t it be nice if you were one of the 10% that didn’t suffer eye damage from diabetes?”

“Um, yes.  But it would be really great if that 10% were a much higher number.”

Wishing you all great allover health.  Have a great weekend.

XOXO

July and August Resolutions

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I totally skipped May/June resolutions.  Busy months.  Yikes.  Let’s just go straight to July/August.

My July/August goal is to work on my book proposal.  But I have A1c Champions training and health coaching and some other diabetes advocacy related endeavors.  So instead I’m changing my goal to something I’m needing right now and that’s to exercise more.  I gain weight if I don’t do a lot of cardio (just the way I’m built I suppose) so though I have a lot of muscle tone, I need to jiggle off some fat before my frustration about said fat gets the best of me.  I plan on getting to the gym 3 times a week to do just cardio. Hold me to it.

Ana’s goal is to research graduate schools and programs.  This year she commences her senior year studying studio art and teaching and she has chosen to continue education.  Annie, consider this your reminder.  Hehe.

Anyway, if you’re new to my goal accomplishment system it’s called the 6 change method by Leo Babauta.  He is the widely popular blogger behind zenhabits.net.  Basically, you pick one change you want to make and focus on it for two consecutive months-plenty of time to make it a habit.

This method worked great for me last year and I’m excited to do it this year.  The blog adds a bit of accountability for me, too.  That, and I share it with my husband so he can help remind me of my goals.

Do you have a way of forming habits or making changes or accomplishing goals?  Share!

Summertime River Adventures

Ana and I (Sysy) have been without power since the mad derecho storm surprised us Friday evening.  Don’t worry, our other sister Sara is keeping us and our insulin at her home.  Anyway, Ana and I are at the library trying to stay cool and…letting the show continue.  Here is a blog Ana wrote from her river adventure last week.  (She was unaware the real summertime adventure was yet to come!) *****

 

"You can't tell but my blood sugar is high"

I know a lot of outdoorsy people, and I can’t say I’m one of them. I mean, I like being outside, but if you asked me to go camping I would be (extremely) reluctant. I don’t blame my diabetes for that—at least not entirely. I try to not let it be reason for not doing something that I actually want to do (like tubing down a river!), which is why I just try to figure out what I need to do and bring with me on outdoor adventures so that I’m prepared for low or high blood sugar levels. And yeah, it’s a little inconvenient to have to carry extra things and worry about the temperature, but it’s way better than the alternative (the alternative being either doing something less exciting or ending up in a hospital…).

So yes, as you can see, I went tubing down a river for the first time this summer! I went with my boyfriend and several friends to the New River Junction in Blacksburg, VA. There were 13 of us total—11 on tubes and 2 in open kayaks. My boyfriend was in one of the kayaks and he had a cooler with my insulin, meter, drinks, and snacks tied to the back of it. I wore water shoes to protect my feet since the whole bottom of the river was just rocks.

Only one person carried their phone with them, so I frequently asked what time it was. We skipped lunch and got in the water at around 1pm, so I told my boyfriend I had to give my Lantus injection in 3 hours. We spent about 2 hours tied together in our tubes just floating down the river—occasionally hitting our rear ends on rocks, but other than that it was pretty peaceful We also went down a small section of rapids, which was probably my favorite part (and I was almost too scared to do it!).

They had buses that would drive you back up to where you get in, so we got on the bus while the 2 kayakers paddled back to meet us. When we got back to the other end, I asked what time it was—it was 3:40. Then I looked for my boyfriend who had my insulin and I could hardly see him because he was so far away. I panicked a little and told the others that I needed my insulin so we got back in the water and they yelled a few times, “Ramonnn!! Ana needs her insulinnn!!” Fortunately he heard so he paddled over to us pretty quickly. Still on my float, I gave my injection, checked my blood sugar, and gave an injection of Novolog because I was really high. I had hardly eaten all day, so I’m guessing the high blood sugar level was a result of the heat, my stress, and also the lack of insulin earlier (I gave less in case I had to swim). Once we got out of the river again, I drank lots of water. It took a while for my blood sugar to come down, so I didn’t eat much for dinner.

In the end, I realized I could have been a bit more prepared, but I didn’t know what to expect so it was hard to plan. Next time I’ll check more frequently and maybe invest in a waterproof watch? I’ll also keep a bottle of water with me (my float has cupholders!). Anyway, from a not-so-outdoorsy person to you, don’t let diabetes keep you from doing what you want! Just do your best in preparing for any adventure you may have (not just outdoors) by anticipating possible situations. Have a wonderful adventure-filled summer!

 

Travelling with Diabetes…and other Health Issues

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I haven’t travelled by plane too much in my life.  I’ve been to visit relatives in Venezuela, gone to Aruba with my pump (would have loved the Omnipod for that trip), went to Mexico for business and my honeymoon, and just this past week, Kansas City for A1c Champions training.

For this trip, I was so nervous about forgetting my insulin that I instead forgot my anxiety and allergy medications.  So not only did I not have my anxiety relief, I endured awful withdrawal symptoms like nausea, extreme anxiety, sweating, insomnia, and dizziness.  And since I didn’t have allergy relief, I got a sinus headache, sore throat, and swollen limph nodes.  Thank goodness the training and the people there were all splendid because without all that going well I would have cried the entire time.

Thanks to that anxiety I was having, my adrenaline sent my blood sugars skyrocketing.  Oh and plane rides seem to make my blood pressure drop, too.  I was almost sure I was going to pass out a few times and since I had forgotten my medic alert bracelet (another genius move), I had to write type 1 diabetes on my wrist with a permanent marker.  Geez, diabetes, how I’d love to leave you at home.

I’m better now and very equipped with information on how to not forget things when I travel again next month (aka, make a travel check list!)  Fingers crossed for a better travel experience.

Any tips for dealing with low blood pressure and motion sickness on planes?  I’m going to be travelling more and could really use some advice on what helps.  Asking the stewardess for a vomit bag does not make the poor soul next to me feel very comfortable.

By the way, if you’re curious about the A1c Champions program, it’s AMAZING.  Seriously, AMAZING.  You can learn more here: A1cChampions.com

The Dangers of Some Diabetes Medications

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*This is a guest post from Barb Stephens from Drugwatch.com, a website which raises awareness to consumers about drug safety information.

There are more than 25 million Americans who have diabetes — that’s more than 8 percent of the population. You may be one of them. If you’re like the majority, you have type 2 diabetes, which means your body does not produce enough insulin or your cells do not use insulin efficiently.

Your doctor may prescribe one or more medications to help you control your diabetes. Make sure you are aware of the dangers of any drug you are given, as side effects for diabetes drugs can range in severity from minor pain to impaired vision to cancer and even death.

Drugs with Severe Side Effects

Thiazolidinediones are the most popular class of diabetes drugs. These medications work by increasing the sensitivity of cells to insulin. Unfortunately, the three drugs in this class have all had serious problems.

Rezulin was the first drug in this class, but it is no long available after being linked to liver failure.

Avandia (rosiglitazone) was the next hit in this class, but it too has been shown to cause severe side effects, including a higher risk of heart attack and liver failure.

Avandia is no longer available in U.S. pharmacies. A few patients still take it, but they have to go through a special program to have access.

Actos (pioglitazone), the world’s best-selling diabetes drug, has also been a huge disappointment.

Bladder cancer is one of the more dangerous side effects of Actos, and in some cases proves fatal.

One study showed that Actos (and Avandia) heighten risk for macular edema, which causes swelling in the eye. Another study showed that the same two drugs raise the risk of bone fractures in post-menopausal women.

Drugs with Less Severe Side Effects

There are other popular diabetes type 2 medications, which all come with common side effects (including low blood sugar). Most of these side effects are milder, like stomachaches, weight gain and gas. Many of these side effects will decrease as your body adjusts to the medication.

Biguanides work by preventing the liver from releasing a high amount of glucose.

Side effects may include nausea, metallic taste in mouth, vomiting, cramps, diarrhea, gas and loss of appetite.

Sulphonylureas work to decrease blood sugar by stimulating insulin release from the pancreas.

If you retain water, have congestive heart failure, or have cirrhosis of the liver, approach with caution.

Side effects may include upset stomach, skin rash or itching, weight gain, breathing difficulties, drowsiness, muscle cramps, seizures and swelling of the face.

Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors stop enzymes that help digest starches, which prevents blood sugar from spiking.

Side effects may include upset stomach, diarrhea and gas.

Meglitnides stimulate the pancreas to produce insulin.

Side effects may include upset stomach.

D-Phenylalanine Derivatives stimulates insulin production after a meal.

Side effects may include dizziness and weight gain.

Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors help insulin to work longer and prevent the liver from producing too much glucose.

Side effects include runny nose, sore throat and headaches.

While the FDA looks into the more serious side effects of these medications some patients have chosen to start filing cases against companies, an example being an Actos lawsuit after incidents of bladder cancer resulted when taking the medication for longer than a year.

You can take an active role in the health by alerting your doctor to any pre-existing conditions and any significant change in your health. You should also read all of the materials that come with your medication.

Author bio: Barb Stephens is a writer for Drugwatch.com. She uses her knowledge about medications to help raise awareness about drug safety and to educate consumers and patients.

My Biggest Worry about Pumps

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“Ketones” by Ana Morales

 

I’m all about people using pumps if they like them (or don’t like them but find they manage their diabetes well with them).  It’s a wonderful device and I’m happy technology like that exists for us.  I used a pump for 7 years, which is plenty of time to experience just what pumping is all about.

So I want to talk about something I noticed during my pumping years and after them.

It occurred to me recently that my numbers rarely go high enough to induce DKA.  I can count on one hand the occasions in the past 5 years where my blood sugar has gone over 350 and it hasn’t been over 400 in 6 years.  I’ve been off the pump for 6 years and find I can’t go back, yet.  One of the most dangerous things in my mind is DKA and very high blood sugars.  I experienced super high blood sugars enough as a teenager to know I never want to go through that again.

When I was on the pump, it was a regular monthly occurrence to have a 400+ blood sugar reading and it was almost always due to a pump or tubing or pump site malfunction.  I knew that my being human provided sufficient variability and error to my diabetes management and I began to seriously resent the pump for adding to that risk simply because I didn’t have the energy to keep up with it’s extra requirements.

What I mean is people who don’t endure these pump issues have very good discipline when it comes to changing their pump site and checking their tubing and changing the site when they suspect they need to.  However, I know that many of us don’t do this.  I completely understand why-it’s hard to keep up this kind of diligence, especially if it means inserting a painfully long needle more times than we’d like.

Those who use pumps should probably be in a very good place when it comes to their motivation to do all that is necessary to successfully use the pump.  I was not one of these people because I resented wearing the pump and as a result, kept my site in too long sometimes and suffered the consequences.  Of course, sometimes, we can do everything right and something wrong can still happen with the pump though the likelihood is very much decreased if we keep up the right routine.

I love using syringes because I get piece of mind each time I give insulin, knowing I don’t have extra variables to contend with (there are SO many as is).  And mostly because I never have a high blood sugar surprise that is a result of my not receiving any basal insulin for a mysterious amount of time.  The danger of very high blood sugar isn’t just that, it’s also the lows that can result from giving insulin over and over again in an effort to push that really high and resistant blood sugar down.

Obviously there is more involved in keeping blood sugars stable.

Reducing my carbs and using shots has made my blood sugars so much more stable, with little extra effort involved.  And to me that’s practically miraculous in terms of gains to my quality of life and health.  So while I don’t mean to say that people shouldn’t use a pump I just think we should each be honest with ourselves about how it works for us.  I realized I was no longer a good candidate and got off the pump and there is nothing wrong with that.  And there is a good possibility that one day I’ll get back on a pump.  They are making wonderful improvements to pumps each year and I’m becoming a more responsible and disciplined person each year.

Very well meaning people tell me all the time, “but don’t you miss being able to sleep in and eat when you want?”  News flash my friends, there are now long acting insulin such as Lantus which serve as a basal insulin.  The NPH and R insulin of the past are just that.

I guess what I’m saying is, are you having a lot of extremely high numbers due to pump issues? If so, work to reduce them with your healthcare team and if you know in your heart that you aren’t keeping up with site changes and all the pump requires, think about your options.  Whatever you do, do it in favor of your health.  Everything else will surely fall into place.

Reminder to Self

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From my head AND my feet.

I recently had a two week stint of…oh I don’t know, diabetes burnout or just feeling “blah” and unmotivated.  I didn’t exercise much for two weeks and I had some processed food and began to need about 25 units of my long acting basal insulin a day.  I’m back on my exercise routine and regular eating pattern and I just wanted to share that I’m down to 15 units of my long acting.  That’s a huge change isn’t it?

I don’t know which I love more: healthy food or exercise.  I feel like I can’t manage my diabetes unless I use the powers of both.

Sometimes I’m jealous of our ancestors.  Exercise was a built in way of life (no cars, no TV, no internet, no food unless you work for it).  Healthy eating was a lot easier (no processed or gmo foods, no two week old produce shipped from another continent.)  See?  They almost had it easier.

How can we make the most of what we have?  How do we exercise smart choices over temptation?

I don’t know about you but what helps me is to meditate and work on being aware of what I want for myself.  This keeps me focused (most of the time) on what needs to be done to get me where I want to go.

I’ll try to remind myself of all this next time I go into a “I don’t feel like it” phase.

Classification of Carbs

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I really believe carb counting alone is insufficient when it comes to my diabetes management.  At least the simple way it’s taught.  It’s just my opinion and I’ll explain why:

I’ve found that for ME, there are adjustments I make for different types of carbs.  These are adjustments beyond just subtracting grams of fiber.  A carb is not a carb.  They vary spectacularly and learning their differences helps me keep my blood sugars in range and helps me decide which carbs to avoid.

I classify my carbs:

-Refined grains

-Sugar/sucrose/plain fructose (no fiber)

-HFCS (High Fructose Corn Syrup)

-Chocolate, ice cream, and other high fat desserts

-Poultry/Meat/Seafood

-Fruits and vegetables

Refined Grains

When I eat anything with processed grains like white rice sushi or pizza or cookies, cake, or crackers, I have to watch out for a post meal blood sugar skyrocket.  It doesn’t happen right away which is why it’s often confusing to dose for these kinds of foods.  For example, last time you had pizza you were high afterwards so this time around you give more insulin, only to get low in the middle-towards the end of your meal.

I find that about 30 minutes after eating anything with refined or processed grains, I have to give another dose of insulin.  An insulin pump option on a dual or square wave bolus works well for a lot of people, but from what I gather, people with and without pumps have a hard time keeping blood sugars in range with processed grains.

Sugar

Eating something like candy made from glucose or sugar or drinking plain 100% juice or sugar sweetened beverage is a bit different.  I find that if I’m going to consume this within a reasonably fast amount time (as opposed to snacking over a period of 30 minutes) then I count carbs and using my 1:15 scale, I give just that amount of insulin.  Then I wait 15 minutes for the insulin to start working (more if I’m not in range).  I find that the insulin cancels out the sugar carbs pretty well and there is no shocking aftermath.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)

This one is interesting.  At least for me (remember, this is just what happens in MY body).  I find that candy or beverages made with HFCS works like when I eat refined grains.  But that makes sense to me when I think about corn being a grain!  It’s easy to forget because people serve it to kids and say “eat your veggies”.

High fat desserts

This gets it’s own category because of the large amount of fat (and because they’re my favorite!)  I try to stick with dark chocolate for a low dose of sugar.  I also make sure to buy desserts that do not have HFCS in it as a sweetener.  I try to get the gourmet kind with minimal ingredients and then I count carbs and give insulin in the middle of eating since the fat content really slows down the absorption of most of these foods.  If there is a lot of sugar I give insulin prior to eating as usual.  I’m referring to a dessert like high fat truffles, mostly.

Poultry/Meat/Seafood

I count carbs and then add a tiny extra amount of insulin to my carb count depending on how much I eat.  I don’t have to do this unless I’m really filling up on this protein source.  I love how these foods fill me up and do very little to my blood sugars.

Vegetables and Fruits

I’m a fan of these, especially in terms of carbs.  As you are well aware, the high antioxidant, vitamin, mineral, fiber, and water content of these foods makes them wonderful for our health.  I definitely don’t need as much insulin for these foods.  I count the carbs and then omit for fiber content.  Fruit is something I stick to consuming in it’s natural state and in small quantities.  The sugar in fruit is fructose and too much overloads the liver, causing fatty liver problems.  Oh and it definitely affects blood sugars.  My favorite are cherries, they are very low glycemic.  Have you tried them for a low?  It takes so many!

I know I didn’t talk about legumes or nuts.  I don’t eat legumes anymore.  I think I ate too many as a kid.  I treat legumes like vegetables and I treat nuts like meat.

With any food:  If I eat a lot, I need to give a little extra insulin for the full stomach effect that Dr. Bernstein has talked about in his books.

I adjust for a few other things.  I’ve mentioned them before but here we go again:

BM status.  Eww, I know.  But being backed up might make a person anticipate a need for more insulin.  The opposite of that issue= less insulin.  So watch out for major lows if you get food poisoning!

Stress.  If I’m stressed, I have to give a little bit extra insulin to combat the stress hormones and their affects on my blood sugars.

Exercise.  Different types of exercise require different diabetes management approaches.  Read Ginger Vieira’s book for that info and so much more-even worksheets for getting all these changes right!

PMS.  Days before I start, I need to up my basal insulin.

Sleep.  If I stay up late (past midnight), I have to give some extra insulin (unless I’m active).

Sedentary.  If I’m being sedentary more than two days in a row due to sickness or diabetes burnout or whatever, I definitely have to up my basal insulin substantially (by 30-40%).

Too much artificial sweeteners.  Certain artificial sweeteners in high doses do contain carbs (it’s a small amount per serving so they’re legally allowed to round down to 0) so if you’re binging on diet coke, check your blood sugar and stay alert to a sneaky increase.

That’s all I can think of.  It’s just an example of how you want to be aware of how your body reacts to different types of food and activity.  You can see why I stick with meat/poultry/seafood, vegetables, and fruits.  Much better blood sugar stability and less variability for me.  But when I do splurge, at least being aware of how those foods act differently help me manage them for those occasions.

I write all this out because you can have tighter blood sugar management.  It helps to learn yourself and the foods you’re eating.  Again, get Ginger’s book or ebook and discover how to improve your blood sugars.  I highly recommend it.

Real Age Diabetes Tool at Diabetes Care Club

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I work a bit at Diabetes Care Club, writing blog posts and helping out on the forums.  While logging on the other day I noticed they entered into an exclusive partnership with Real Age to create a diabetes specific real age evaluator.  I thought this was cool because I’ve taken the Real Age Test before but was a bit bummed out by how it wasn’t able to capture information based on my diabetes management and therefore not really give me a more accurate or personalized assessment.

My Real Age Diabetes score is 26-which is pretty encouraging considering I’m about to turn 29 in a couple weeks.  That’s the fun game aspect of the Real Age test but it’s not what I consider the most important aspect.  The test asks questions on every element of health imaginable and then, depending on your answers, gives you information and recommendations.

I found this test to be a helpful tool to me because it pointed out my weaknesses in my overall health.  For example, I realized that I’m eating and exercising pretty well most of the time but maybe I’m not as socially active as I’d like to be or I’m not testing as often as I’d like.  Also, the test reminded me about all the annual diabetes wellness check ups I should be having such as a visit to the eye doctor and podiatrist.

We don’t necessarily need help pointing out what we’re doing right.  We need help to pinpoint what we need to improve upon and taking the Real Age Diabetes assessment helps to organize your strengths and weaknesses in an easy to view and understand way.  And yes, it is kind of fun to work to lower one’s “real age”, I’m not going to lie.

Something I want to mention:  The regular Real Age test gave me a score of 24 and the Diabetes one a score of 26.  I think that’s interesting to note because it shows how diabetes does make a difference-not that we didn’t know that!  But it shows that creating a diabetes focused Real Age test was really worthwhile.  The truth hurts but it’s also empowering.  Let’s try to focus on the empowering part and on the part we CAN influence.

Take the test here! (you will have to register and sign in first)

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