Category Archives: featured

Traveling with Diabetes

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I’ve travelled several times each month this year and it’s given me some lessons:

I’ve learned that I get motion sickness on planes and cannot travel without taking Dramamine.  I tried to forego it once and that one time we just so happened to have a bumpy ride.  It is not fun to worry about dropping blood sugars while throwing up and being jostled about in the tiny plane lavatory. 

Taking all the airport stairs and skipping the moving sidewalks (is that what they’re called?) is a good way to combat all the sitting involved in travel.

Staff on planes are always happy.  I still haven’t met one that isn’t, which is freaky, but if I’m feeling low, so far they are quick to grab juice if I need it and want to conserve my glucose tablet stash for later.

The food situation when in an airport is mighty tricky.  Temptation abounds and yet the easiest way I’ve found to travel is to keep it real low carb because if things get hectic, and lately in airports, they always seem to, low carb often saves me amidst skipped blood sugar checks.

Given how close one’s next seat neighbor is in coach, I find it remarkable how injecting insulin in front of that neighbor has never been an awkward experience.  In fact, it’s a great conversation starter and I’ve literally written down each starting line for your own amusement:

“Wow, those needles are tiny, I’m so glad for you.”

“So you have diabetes, huh?”

“OMG, do you need sugar?”

“Ok, what do I do if you pass out on this flight?”

“Wow, in and out, just like that, eh?  It takes me longer to sneeze.”

“How long have you had it?”

And my personal favorite:  “Does it hurt? I’m sorry, of course it hurts, what was I thinking? That was such a stupid thing to say, I’m so sorry, I didn’t mean to say that, I just figured that it hurts but maybe it doesn’t or maybe you’re used to it, is that it, are you used to it? Wait…I take that back, I get migraines and I seriously doubt I’ll ever get used to them.  Just forget I said that, ok?”  5 seconds later:  “So, where ya headed?”

Smile

What Diabetes Technology Can’t Replace

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If successful diabetes management is based upon a multitude of decisions we make during the day, why is technology often regarded as the number one asset in our diabetes management arsenal?

It can’t possibly be.  Take some important daily decisions that all impact diabetes:

-what to eat

-when to eat

-how much to eat

-how much insulin to give

-when to give insulin

-when to exercise

-what type of exercise to do

-how much to exercise

-when to test blood sugar

-how often to test blood sugar

And on and on!

Now basic technology like a meter is huge.  But, only if we choose to use it.  And a pump, for many of us, makes it easier to eat and deliver insulin as needed and to do a wide variety of exercises, as long as we choose to use it properly.  A CGM gives us information about trends and helps us catch highs and lows before they get too high or low.  Not to mention it can help save our lives by alerting us to dramatic blood sugar levels. 

So technology is awesome!

That’s indisputable.

It would seem that those using all of this technology would always have better diabetes management than those who only use a meter and syringes, right?  And yet, in my personal experience, I’ve met many people who use a meter and syringes and do very well and people who use all the technology available and don’t do very well. 

There are other important variables that always need to be considered.  So when a person is struggling with their diabetes management, often times more questions need to be asked than what is often asked.  Most likely, a person who can do well with a pump, can do well without one.  And CGM’s are most dramatically beneficial to those who can’t feel their lows or have young children with diabetes. 

My cautioning is really about avoiding the conclusion that, “If I had a pump, my diabetes would be controlled” or “I probably just need a CGM to have controlled blood sugars” without considering other factors. This isn’t to say these tools won’t dramatically help one’s management.  There is no guarantee and the decisions a person takes throughout the day is a better indicator of how a person will do with diabetes technology.

So if you’re struggling with your diabetes management, assess the root of your individual struggle.  Some people’s issues are best addressed with technology, but many issues are addressed outside of technology and skipping this facet of diabetes management can prove extremely frustrating and detrimental. 

I know because I’ve been there, done that.  Address your personal needs and let your blood sugars be your guide.  What technology can’t begin to replace is you and your knowledgeable decisions, which require knowledge about your diabetes.  Make sure your bases are covered before relying on gadgets.

Minimalism in Diabetes and Life

Thank you for all the emails of concern over my blogging break this summer and fall.  It was very nice to be missed.  I’m happy to be back.

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Over 6 years ago, when I ended my 7 year run with a Minimed insulin pump and switched to “the poor man’s” vial and syringes, I discovered something interesting about myself.  I functioned better when I practiced minimalism.  Not having so many balls in the air at once just feels easier.  I don’t even replace my syringes or lancets but once every week and several months, respectively.  I’ve never had an infection or any other problem as a result-at least not one I’m aware of.  And this makes me feel a bit more streamlined in my diabetes management.  I’m not saying I recommend being lazy about changing needles but practicing overall minimalism in my diabetes management works for me at the present time. 

In the past, all my constant logging, pumping, and the checks and balances that goes along with that overwhelmed me into not doing anything well.  Whereas now, I do the few essential things as well as possible, with A1c results I’m happy about.  It may be my personality type or my lifelong struggle with anxiety but either way it’s true for me and we all need to work with what is true for each of us.

I’ve been travelling a lot lately and I’ve been amazed at how I can go days with just a small carry on bag and my purse and not even need all that I packed.  And that includes carrying all my back up diabetes supplies which take up a good bit of room. The experience has taken away this fear I’ve always had where I ask my anxiety ridden self, “but what if I need it?!”  Now I just think of how much nicer it is to get around the airport with a small bag and how quick and easy packing is.  I’m less likely to forget something crucial, as well.

True and lasting change takes time and my moving towards minimalism has been a slow and deep process.  For the first time I’m truly aware of how ridiculous our consumer culture is.  I hate what we’re doing to the environment and ourselves.  I notice my sense of calm when I go somewhere that is totally uncluttered.  I can think and focus better in that environment.  I also have learned that more stuff does in no way translate to more happiness.  Though I can admit that being above the poverty level and therefore having sufficient safety and health affirming opportunities is important and absolutely impacts happiness levels.  But if we only refer to extras, I just spent the summer in a huge house at a lake paying zero in rent and I felt depressed the whole time. 

My favorite thing since childhood has been the computer.  I don’t know how many kids had a computer at home in 1993 but I did.  I saw the potential of this great mysterious box and as they took off better and better every minute, I became only more grateful that I had been born at a time when the world was at our fingertips.  Not to mention accessing information that was more real time than a book was super exciting.  Like most people, I love learning and the age of the internet has been my greatest ally, especially as a drop out college student married to a drop out college student.  We haven’t been hindered by our drop out status in terms of knowledge (unless you beg to differ) and that’s a righteous equalizing factor.  (Though in job searching we all know a degree still outweighs so many other valuable assets and qualities but that is a discussion for another day).

Part of what being globally connected has done for me is give me a very real view of how others think and live.  And it’s been impossible for me to ignore the fact that we have enough resources for all humans to have all they need.  We just don’t have enough for all of our wants.  Suddenly I feel greedy and I welcome that feeling because I don’t want to be talked about by my great grandchildren as the stubborn old woman that was gratuitously a part of a careless, destructive, insensitive, and idiotic generation that put greed before humanity.  I want them to know I was doing my tiny part to mitigate damage in my own home, community, and country.  I want them to know that I didn’t carry the attitude of a victim, of someone who says, “well, what do ya do” or “if you can’t beat em’, join em’”.  Bull.  Bull!  I want my grandchildren and great grandchildren to know that I felt guilty about how I was living and motivated and inspired by others to act and make any change I could to make something, anything, better. 

And that leads me to where I feel I’m now more quickly headed.  The movement of minimalism is becoming more popular.  Now there are those who criticize minimalists for being trendy.  But I’m glad it’s catching on and truthfully, it’s being criticized because every time someone talks about it we are basically causing others to self reflect and to feel that we are rejecting much of society.  It’s not like my life’s goal was to reject much of society.  It’s actually in my nature to agree with you as much as possible.  But self reflection and awareness has put me here.

Anyway, what’s great is that there is no right way to practice minimalism  The key is to be aware, to be conscious of how we live and to make changes where we can.  To reject it is fine.  But there are consequences.  That’s just a fact.  I no longer feel comfortable living the way most do in the US.  That doesn’t mean I judge you for not feeling the same way.  It just means that we should all be discussing this and supporting each other.  In other words, I tell you about my minimalism journey and stop right there and you tell me about all your shopping trips and stop right there.  I don’t tell you you’re doing something wrong and you certainly don’t tell me I’m nuts for trying to live with a lot less.  This has been a very recent change for me and even now I still waste paper towels like nobody’s business so I don’t have room to judge.  I do like talking about it because that’s how I got introduced-by others talking about it with me or writing about their experiences with it.  I am so thankful for their time and willingness to share how and why they do what they do.

So what is my family doing now?

Well, first of all, I’ve been getting rid of a lot of material goods this year.  It stung for a second and then I forgot I ever owned any of it. 

I also grabbed a few items by the dumpster and refurbished them with my husband.  He fixed them up and I painted them-which turned out to be some of the best meaningful fun I’ve had all year. 

Our cheap dining room table set broke years ago and we couldn’t afford to replace it so Alex (my husband) made a farmhouse style table with simple benches and together we stained it teak and Caribbean blue.  The entire project cost less than $100 and we are so proud of our table.  Our children loved witnessing planks of wood turn into something so useful. 

I’ve been scanning and backing up documents in order to free ourselves of paper weight. 

We sold our second car super cheap in an act of charity and just go everywhere together.  This works well for us because Alex drives a company truck to and from work.

My brother in law gave us his TV but we still don’t pay for cable TV, instead we use Netflix or Hulu to watch TV using the WII my husband received as a gift.  It’s cheaper and we spend a lot less time in front of the TV.

We just bought a 900 square ft house with no basement or functional attic.  My son and daughter will share a bedroom, which is going against the norm unless you go to other parts of the world where entire families eat, sleep, and entertain in one room.  We hope to have a smaller footprint that way and to be forced into not buying so much stuff because, “where on earth would we be able to put it?” 

Alex and I have never had credit cards. And when there is extra money, we’ve paid off tuition, medical debt, whatever we can, instead of taking a vacation. We haven’t had a vacation since our honeymoon 5 years ago but there is definitely less stress in paying things off when possible.  When people say “you can afford that” we say, “no we can’t”  And it’s a dignified, “no, really, we can’t and don’t want to be burdened with debt, be irresponsible with money, or give in to the seductive pleasure of mindless shopping and imaginary needs.”  And I am just like anyone else.  I get cheered up by buying things.  I love clothes.  I love books.  I love STUFF.  I have fooled myself into believing I can heal my anxiety with a shopping trip.  But, what I’ve learned is it’s a temporary fix.  And then I’m back to where I started, only, with less money.

We try to eat very simple whole foods with few ingredients just to make preparation and clean up that much easier.  We are slowly getting rid of kitchen supplies.  It’s a little scary but eventually we want to just have a bowl, spoon, fork, and mug for each of us and just wash after every use.  No more piles of dishes!  I know that sounds crazy but if you come over I will have delectable finger foods for you, great wine that we’ll drink out of, I dunno, something, and fun conversation-all to distract you from our primitive approach.  I’m trying to make my new mantra, “people, not things”.

We plan on growing some of our own food.  There will be a major learning curve but, we are committed to giving it a good shot. 

We plan on homeschooling the kids which will help us with having a more pleasant schedule and less hectic times throughout the day.  Less stress is always a plus.  Additionally, it has been brought to my attention that right now, the greatest indicator of a child’s outcome in school is their family income and not their performance or work ethic or testing ability.  I’m not playing that game.  If we can manage and meet everyone’s needs then we’ll do it, if not, then we’ll try something else.

I have been slowly getting rid of clothes.  I noticed a while back that my husband is always better dressed than me and I think it’s because he sticks with a simple routine:  button up shirt or polo, khakis or jeans, leather shoes-and done.  He gets colors that he likes and he gets high quality so he can use his clothes for years.  So I’m trying to simplify my dressing by getting rid of everything that isn’t awesome on me (because, really, why do I want to wear anything that looks less than awesome on me?)  As a result, I’ve gotten rid of 75% of my closet!  But, it feels great and laundry is sooo much easier!  I’ve heard of people who own two pairs of pants and two t-shirts and that’s all they wear and it sounds amazing but I’m definitely not there,  yet. 

I’ve discovered the magic of Goodwill.  It’s hit and miss and I’ve learned you have to be picky, but people have been amazed by what I get from there which cost next to nothing.  The key is to make sure it serves a strong purpose and doesn’t add to clutter, something I should write on my hand before my trips there. 

Well that’s it, I think.  Again, these aren’t things anyone else should do, this is just what we feel we can do and we have a long way to go but it’s a process.  We’re just going to do what feels right. 

A part of me does feel like I’m making a statement with my minimalist diabetes management approach.  I want to be an example to those with limited resources and say, “you can do it with the basics, and do it well.”  A lack of money absolutely harms health but just enough money is another story.  I have just enough money for the basics which does include sufficient test strips for each day-excellent blood sugar control is not up for discussion.  I don’t need a pump or continuous glucose monitor, though it’s relative isn’t it?  If I die tomorrow of a middle of the night low blood sugar everyone will say I did need it.  But, if I die tomorrow in a car accident, you could say that I needed perhaps a different car or that I needed to have taken a better route or skipped a dumb errand.  If I die from a stroke, you could say I needed to have changed some part of my lifestyle or taken some type of medication.  The point is with so many variables each day affecting our well being it’s just not cut and dry.  I feel that my very simple approach forces me to maintain an important discipline that extends into all parts of my life.  That discipline is ultimately responsible for my diabetes management and how well it goes.  And that’s what I really wanted to share today Smile

Do you practice any kind of minimalism?  If so, I’m interested in learning more, please share in comments.

Diabetes Blog Week 2013 Day 1

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It’s:

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Often our health care team only sees us for about 15 minutes several times a year, and they might not have a sense of what our lives are really like. Today, let’s pretend our medical team is reading our blogs. What do you wish they could see about your and/or your loved one’s daily life with diabetes? On the other hand, what do you hope they don’t see?  (Thanks to Melissa Lee of Sweetly Voiced for this topic suggestion.)

 

Hmm…  Ok.  I want my medical team to know that I know that they don’t know as much as they think they know about my diabetes.  I do have to say however, my endo is extremely insightful about my type 1 diabetes.  He doesn’t assume things and he seems very aware of the challenges involved in managing type 1 diabetes and for that I’m grateful.  As for the rest of the team:  Just know that you don’t know much.  That would really help me out.  Really.

Oh and I’ll be happy to answer any questions you have.

Zoloft Killed that Loving Feeling

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I’m weaning myself off Zoloft.

I’ve been on it for about a year and a half now.  It has one major side effect for women-a sharp decrease in libido.  Others say it completely wipes it out.  I guess it depends on the person and how much they are taking.  Zoloft is an extremely popular drug in the US for anxiety and depression.  I started taking it for anxiety and a PMS disorder that I have and have been getting myself off because that one side effect is just too much.  I mean, I didn’t marry my husband so that we could just be best buds who partner up to raise children together, ya know?

But, getting off Zoloft takes time because withdrawal symptoms are harsh.  The times I’ve missed a dose or two I’ve felt like a squirrel on crack (I dunno, just picture what that must be like) and had major nausea on top of that.  A friend of mine recently pointed out the brilliance of this drug’s natural marketing ability.  Stopping it causes anxiety and depression which is what it treats in the first place.  There doesn’t seem to be any major health risks associated with taking it so it’s easier in the short term to just keep taking it.  Except if you’re a female, of course, and not a nun.

I can’t tell you how embarrassing it is to write publicly about this.  I do so because I think it’s possible that this drug has been responsible for some divorces or major relationship woes out there.  Because if you’re not aware of this side effect, you really might think you no longer love the person you’re with.  I mean, this is what separates us from our friends!  Seriously, without the awareness of Zoloft’s side effects your physical symptoms which manifest as “don’t touch me” might tell your logic (and that of your partner’s) that “I’ve lost that loving feeling, time to move on”.  I’ve always been one to research whatever medication I take to be aware of side effects so luckily for me it was more a matter of working around the issue with a patient and understanding husband.

Honestly, the way I’m working around the issue now is getting off this darn pill.  I’m down to 35mg and while I do this, I am finding it harder to cook, clean, and get out of bed in the morning (in other words, doing things I dislike).  I also worry about my anxiety raising my blood pressure, which has been high in the past and therefore a problem I realistically foresee having “any day now”.  But, I feel more like myself (I’m a naturally moody person, perhaps I should embrace that fact and just go with it) and I’m finding that exercising to the point of dripping with sweat is the best remedy for my negative tendencies.  Exhaustion from working out is calming so, it works as long as I just do it.

I’m all for a holistic lifestyle but also getting help when it’s needed.  Right now I need off this and if shoving my behind out the door every other day for a 5k run is going to help, then I will just have to suck it up.  So far so good!

One more thing, do I regret taking Zoloft in the first place?  Um, not really.  I was having panic attacks and not parenting my young children as well as I could because I was paranoid of what might happen to them.  Taking this for a while helped me not feel so afraid and live life without so much hesitation.  My whole family benefited from this.  But I think I’m ready to live without it.

Anyone else have experience with this?

Juice Fasting with Type 1 Diabetes

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I’ve written about juicing in the past here.  Last week I decided to try a few days of juice fasting.  I drank about 2 to 3 liters of vegetable and fruit juice each day and the only other thing I consumed was water.  I used a high quality omega brand juicer and drank mostly non starchy vegetables.  I lasted 4 whole days.  Here’s how it went down:

First of all, why did I do this?

Several reasons.  First of all, I just felt like it was the right time for me, motivation-wise.  But, also I was extremely curious to see how someone with type 1 diabetes, like myself, would manage such a drastic reduction in calories and a juice fast.  I also wanted to welcome springtime with tons of fruits and vegetables without their pulp for an infusion of vitamins and minerals.  And I wanted to reset my way of eating.  I hate Winter and so every year when it’s cold and dark, I tend to comfort myself too much with sugary and fatty foods.  It doesn’t matter how healthy walnuts and almonds are, eating too many will make you fat.  It seems easier for me to do something extreme like a juice fast in order to remind myself how much better it feels on a really healthy diet.  Last summer I did a raw food detox for a few days and felt so great, lowered my need for insulin, and felt ready to eat healthier again so I figured this would be similar.

Day 1

I started on a Saturday.  I felt fine until mid afternoon when I developed a headache.  I was outside much of the day and running after the kids.  It was probably good I stayed a little active.  I don’t know if the fast caused my headache because I have allergies and during this time of year I get the type of headache I had that day so maybe, maybe not, I don’t know.  Either way, the headache got worse and worse (it was like a migraine).  By 10pm I was in agony and threw up 5 times and shivered violently for a good hour.  My blood sugar dropped and I had to get orange juice in me.  My husband was my nurse and checked my blood sugar every hour until 1am while I slept it off.  This wasn’t uncommon for me.  I am very sensitive to nausea and migraines often make me throw up several times a year so again, I don’t know if this was something I can attribute to the fast but it certainly was a miserable start and I worried if I was going to last another day.  That night I injected half of my long acting basal insulin and it ended up working perfectly.

Day 2

The next morning I woke up feeling perfectly fine.  No headache, no weakness, no morning stiffness in my joints.  I jumped out of bed in a majorly uncharacteristic way and got straight to juicing breakfast.  The entire day went amazing.  I felt great though I did take a nap (something I never, ever do) in the afternoon.

Day 3

I woke up wonderfully again and this time felt like I was floating on air.  This was so strange.  I told Alex, “I feel…euphoria!”  And then I googled “symptoms of a fast” and found that people often feel “euphoria”.  Wow.  Ok, so it’s not just me making this up.  I felt extremely peaceful and calm and happy.  I napped again this day.

Day 4

I felt fine again but started getting loose stools and that progressed for the worse during the day, leaving me feeling a bit dehydrated and uncomfortable.  And my peace was decidedly disturbed.  I chose to end the fast that night because during the next 2 days I was to drive a total of 12 hours to presentations about diabetes and didn’t want to be stuck in a car on the interstate while needing a restroom.  Not to mention diabetes and dehydration is a bad combination.  It only takes one high blood sugar for things to possibly swing out of control.  I made a pact with myself before I started the fast to above all, be safe.  I would have liked to continue but I think for my first juice fast 4 whole days was probably ideal.

Random things about this experience:

-I am an A blood type which is associated with eating more of a vegetarian type diet.  I looked into my metabolic typing a while back and found out I’m what they call a “carb type” which happened to correlate with my blood type.  Ignoring all this information, I have to admit I’ve always felt best on fruits, vegetables, and light protein sources like chicken, white fish, and legumes.  A juice fast is really great for my “type” (whatever that really is) and perhaps that’s why I didn’t have a lot of the negative symptoms others report during these fasts.  Just a thought.

-I’ve heard of people doing a juice fast by blending fruits and vegetables in a blender and then straining the pulp.  I wouldn’t recommend this as the best option because the fast motion of the blender is harsh on the valuable nutrients in the foods.  An Omega single masticating juicer is gentle and while it completely separates the pulp from the juice, it leaves all your vitamins and minerals intact.  The downside is these juicers are expensive and take up a lot of space.  I love mine (and am grateful I bought it before the kids were born-you know back when I had more money).

-I also know some people do a juice fast with store bought juices.  This is not a “juice fast”.  Store bought juices are miserably deficient in the valuable nutrients the foods once contained because they’ve been pasturized and stored for far too long.  Making your own juice means you know how fresh your fruits and veggies and herbs are, you ensure their cleanliness, and if you drink them right away, you get loads of nutrition in a glass that many people rarely get in a full week.

-It’s probably not correct to call this a “detox” because from what I understand, and I could be wrong, to detox you need fiber which will act like a sweeper of your colon.  Maybe what I’ll do next is just use the same foods but put them in a blender for green smoothies.  A green smoothie detox!

-Juicing omits all the fiber so nutrients are more easily digested and absorbed by the body.

-I juiced the following foods:  kale, collard greens, spinach, celery, beets, carrots, ginger, mint, cilantro, bok choy, arugula, cabbage, watermelon, blueberries, apple, lemon, oranges, and grapefruit.  You’d be surprised how good mint and ginger makes these juices taste :)

-I lost 4 pounds on the fast, my skin looked great, I felt more in tune with my body, and very satisfied with life.  All in all I can’t wait to do it again, if only for a weekend.  It’s been a week since my fast and I’m still using lowered insulin requirements so this seems to help me with my insulin resistance problems.  Now I just have to continue to eat right.  But if I slide out of place I know this may be just the encouraging boost I need to get me back on track.

Disclaimer:  I’m not a doctor nor any kind of medical professional.  So don’t take my word for any of this, it’s just my experience and I’m drawing from my personal knowledge base. Some people do not eliminate on fasts (which is important) and endure irreversible damage to their vital organs such as their kidneys and liver.  A fast is something very serious if you have a health condition and you want to really research the topic, perhaps talk to your medical team, and definitely listen to your body through the entire process.  Beginners should do very short fasts at first as should people who eat an unhealthy diet.  Drink plenty of liquids, rest as needed, and stick to light exercise.  A fast should not feel awful and if it does, stop.

March and April 2013 Resolutions

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For January and February my goal was small because this is the hardest time of the year for me.  Winter wears me out and the lack of warm sunny days challenges my healthy lifestyle habits.  There’s something about the cold and how it makes me want to cuddle up on the couch with some tea and enjoy my biggest not-so-guilty pleasure, White Collar with Alex.

My goal was just to practice giving my presentations about diabetes in Spanish.  And so I did.  My problem has been more about a lack of fluidity between tricky words and sentences versus not knowing what to say or how to say it.  It’s worked for me at jobs in the past but when giving a presentation it seems important that a message come across smoothly.  With each presentation I’m doing better and the fear of speaking Spanish is behind me, um, mostly.

Now onward to March and April, or just err…April.  Spring is here and while allergies cause me a lot of serious fatigue (seriously, the body just. shuts. down.) I am still eager to enjoy warmer weather and longer days.  Of course, as I type this at 6:46pm on a Sunday in Spring I’ll admit it has been snowing all day.  Go figure.

My goal is to jump back into exercise.  Not that I ever stopped but I since Winter is a hard time for me-a time of surviving versus thriving if you will, I did just enough to get by.  I feel the need to sweat more.  I need to get toxins out.  This is a perfect time because Spring naturally brings greens and berries with it which help detox the body.

I realize this post is super late but I have been working on my goal all month.  Every other day my workout is a tad more intense and that’s enough to make a big difference in my body and energy levels.  So far so good!

*A few days later*

I’m now on day three of a juice fast.  I’m juicing mostly vegetables and only consuming that and water.  It’s been really awesome thus far.  A post on the entire experience to come.  I gotta see how long I can go first SmileDuring this time it’s just been yoga, which I’m surprised I can even do while on a juice fast in the first place.  Who knew?

What are you working on?

Things to Remember If You Take Insulin

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I have been on shot therapy for the last 6 years.  Before that I used a pump but we didn’t get along because I was out of control with my diabetes at the time.  I do well with shots so I stick with them for now.  These tips apply with taking insulin by shots or a pump.

There are a few things I have to constantly remind myself of when taking insulin.  Things that make everything go more smoothly.

So I’m going to share 5 Things to Remember if You Take Insulin:

1.  Read the pamphlet of information about your fast acting insulin or ask your doctor to find out how many minutes it takes your fast acting to start working.

Mine takes about 15 minutes.  So test well before eating a meal and then give your insulin some time to start working.  If my sugar is 100 before a meal, I give it about 10 minutes to start working, less if my meal has a lot of fat or slow moving carbs like legumes.  If my sugar is 150, I wait about 25 minutes before eating.  This isn’t a hard rule, and I don’t recommend you do exactly what I do.  I recommend that you figure out how long it takes your insulin to start working and then give it some time before digging into your meal.  Ideally, when the carbs in our meal start raising our blood sugar, our insulin will be there to cancel it out.  If you don’t do this, chances are you will start causing your sugar to climb and then the insulin will have a late start and have a harder time pushing down your higher blood sugar.  End result?  Post meal blood sugar levels that leave you assuming your insulin dosage for your meal wasn’t accurate.  But, maybe it was accurate.  Maybe you just didn’t time things right.

2.  Every time you give insulin a certain amount isn’t going to be properly absorbed by the body.  And that certain amount is random and unpredictable.  This means that if you want more consistency with blood sugars, being careful with carbohydrates, particularly those in starchy processed foods is your best bet.  I’m not saying eat low carb, just saying that it’s impossible to always give the perfect amount of insulin.  Knowing this helps me plan meals and check any extra guilt and frustration at the door.

3.  If you take a long acting insulin, find out how many hours it lasts.  You may be surprised to find that a 24 hour insulin isn’t exactly 24 hours but a little less than that.  Knowing this, you can predict when your blood sugars may begin to rise and counter that with a little exercise or fast acting insulin.

4.  Find out how long your insulin lasts once opened and then get rid of it when that time comes.  Otherwise you shouldn’t be surprised when blood sugars seem inexplicably off.  I sometimes use my insulin a little longer than I should to save money.  And I pay the price.  But I do so knowingly and I share this so that no one pays the price out of just not being aware.  So arm yourself with knowledge and then try to make a wiser choice than me. Winking smile

5.  Last but not least, when it seems your insulin just isn’t working, don’t go more than a week without trying to figure out what’s going on.  Try changing the bottle.  Check and see if you have any infections or chronic pain happening.  Make sure you’re not allergic to your insulin and report any strange aftermath on your body where you gave insulin.  If you’ve ruled that out, check your body for any dark brown markings that often indicate insulin resistance.  Sometimes I will get those marks somewhere under my bra where friction happens.  Ask your doctor about them if you have them.

Me?  I shun all processed foods and make sure I’m eating well and getting exercise.  Usually reducing my carbs a little and doing exercise at least 3 times a week helps greatly to get my insulin working well again.  Maybe I’m susceptible to this because I have a lot of type 2 diabetes in the family but either way, I try not to go long with insulin that doesn’t seem to be working well.  For me it’s usually insulin resistance and it’s a sign I need to tweak my lifestyle a bit.  I’ve even gone “raw” for a week or two to get back on track.  The longer you deal with high blood sugars, the worse you’ll feel and risk down spiraling somewhere hard to climb out of so get to the bottom of consistent and inexplicable highs ASAP so you can feel better sooner rather than later.  To busy in your life to do this?  Just remember, diabetes comes first because it damages every cell in the body.  And before you let that get you down, just think, you and I have some measure of control over our diabetes right?  Let’s take advantage of that!

Have a great one!

How the DOC Helped Me Check Again

Part of a diabetes art showing by Ana Morales

 

There have been times when I’ve slacked when it comes to how often I check my blood sugars.  Sometimes I get down to 4 times a day and I know that isn’t personally enough-not for my aggressive control of blood sugars.  But, I rarely keep that up for long because being connected to the DOC, or Diabetes Online Community, means constant reminders of how important checking blood sugars is along with encouragement and people to really relate to.

In January I ran out of test strips because I had given half of my last shipment to my brother, who was just recently diagnosed with type 1 and then I ran out of money.  I had to put money into paying rent and bills and focused on just getting by while not feeling pity for myself but instead, feeling happy and grateful that I normally am able to afford all that I need for my diabetes.

I made a comment on Facebook about having run out of strips and was shocked by how many fellow people with diabetes suddenly told me they would send me some extras they had.  Several people knew I didn’t have a certain kind of meter and ended up sending me strips and the meter that corresponded.

It has been so heartwarming.  Strips are a precious commodity for us people with diabetes-and they cost a lot  So to me these acts of kindness are HUGE!

I was getting by decently by eating low carb, skipping meals, and trying to constantly guess my blood sugars.  Thanks to certain members of the DOC, I was able to stop the stressful madness and check again.

I can’t thank you enough,.  Thank you, thank you, thank you.

I accepted the help on the condition that if these people ever needed anything they’d let me know.  I hope they know I mean that ;)

Just another reason why being part of the DOC is awesome.

The Case for Diabetes Cure Hope

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It takes bravery and guts to hope.  It’s a leap of faith.  There’s a vulnerability in it.  I love those qualities in people so I always encourage myself to feel hopeful about things.  Even if I’d rather put myself in a more protective state and cross my arms, shake my head, and tell myself that hoping is for ignorant suckers.

It’s not.

It’s beautiful and scary and takes patience.  I also believe it sets a very particular vibe that positively touches everyone and everything around it.

This week we heard two news stories come out about diabetes research.  I find them both uplifting because it gives me the feeling that we’re moving in the right direction, that we’re learning more things, and I’m reminded with this news that researchers are working on figuring diabetes out.  All that encourages me.  I’m doing my part by taking care of myself, and they are doing theirs by making strides in research-it’s excellent teamwork.

If I put myself in the frame of mind of a person whose child has type 1 diabetes, and I can’t feel what they feel, only I try to imagine more or less- I admit I feel an overwhelming sense of urgency and desperation.  I have a child that’s very allergic to some common foods and I see that as much easier to handle than a child with type 1 diabetes.  And even with my situation I feel desperation.  I’m anxiously awaiting relief of my way of life which includes more fear, home cooking, and limitations for my daughter and our entire family than we’d otherwise have.  I’m working on this.  I’m constantly trying to keep fear in check, to recognize that home cooking is healthier and cheaper anyway, and trying to see that limitations are only what we view them as.  In other words, I don’t live by the ocean and as a result, don’t get to see it often.  But I don’t view that as a limitation, it’s just the way it is.  Well, we don’t eat out due to allergies and it’s just the way it is for us.  The real tragedy in our case would be lack of food or epi-pens in a time of need.  So perspective and gratitude is huge in our day to day happiness.

However, type 1 in children is a complicated beast that puts a child in danger 24/7.  Is there anything else like that for a child outside of other serious conditions and extremely harsh living environments?  What I’m saying is that the seemingly irrational fear of parents of children with type 1 is something that really deserves our understanding, patience, and compassion.  Hope in their hands regarding a cure for type 1 diabetes is a very fragile thing.  And I’m just saying that I recognize that and cannot judge that position.

On the other hand as someone who made it through childhood with type 1, I feel much less fear and desperation for a cure for myself and unchecked I actually feel a tinge of pride and arrogance about how I’ve made it without a cure and all while being told every five years that the cure was right around the corner.  What did that do to me?  At first I felt like a ragdoll in a child’s hands.  Then I allowed it to give me a little bit of a shell.  A rigid, chilly shell.  But over the years I’ve let that go because like I said earlier, it’s a beautiful thing to feel hope.  I prefer being soft, pliable, open, and able to adapt to change.  I hated how at 13 years old, I felt embarrassed to show positive emotions because of how that emotion could turn sour all of a sudden and someone might witness that and I’d publically lose face.  I secretly preferred and longed to get myself back to a time when I would hear happy news, smile and leap for joy and then have my hopes dashed and suddenly pout and sigh from a sense of loss but soon get over it.  Am I saying I’d like to be like a child again?  Kind of yeah.  I watch my toddlers and am constantly amazed at their range of emotions in such a short time span.  They feel what they feel when they feel it.  Then they let it out, let it go, and move on.  It’s healthy and sweet and vulnerable and I admire and cherish this about them.  I also can’t help but notice that most children do this and it’s partly what allows them to generally learn so quickly, be so happy, and forgive so easily.

So for those of you with a bit of snark about the news that seems blown out of proportion or who feel that you’ve lost all hope and trust because of past promises about a cure, I understand that, too.  But, I wish for you to let go some of the pain from the past because well…it seems like a miserable weight to carry around.  Hope is light and energetic and doubt and sarcasm seem like the opposite.

No matter what, those of us with diabetes have it right now and that means we have to deal with it.  It begs to be managed and so our best bet is to live in the moment with it.  Not easy, I know, but what’s the alternative?  After all, nothing about having hope means ignoring reality-that would be more accurately described as delusion or assumption or arrogance.

But allowing hope to help us through our reality, well that’s it’s greatest purpose isn’t it?

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