Category Archives: product review

My Favorite App is a Mood and Period Tracker

I struggled with the title for this post. I wanted to call it “You Need This App!” but I imagined people would then start reading and be discouraged by the surprise theme of menstruation on a diabetes blog. However, I am certainly talking about a mood and period tracker app and it really is my favorite app.  It has improved my well-being.  It has helped my relationship with my husband.  It’s got an alienating and cheesy name-are you ready for it?  “Hormonescope”.  Look beyond that and let me explain.

We women know all too well that in the days leading up to our period, our hormone levels change.  What I have learned is that they fluctuate all month long and these fluctuations are legitimate motivators to our changing moods and behavior.  I got this app last year and quickly realized that each day, when I read what was going on with my body and why, I could easily be more in control of my day(s).

This app tracks you from the starting date of your last period and then gives you a daily “hormonescope” that is not ridiculous at all but based on science.  I decided to test it out by writing down how I was feeling each day and then reading my information for the day.  What I found was that when I was feeling more sensitive to pain, the app knew about it.  When I was feeling like a homebody, the app knew about it.  When I was feeling like dressing up and wearing lipstick, the app knew about it.  When I was about to become almost irrational with my emotions, the app knew about it.  In other words, the science was well researched to generally describe what our hormones do throughout the month and when they would do it and how that translates into typical behavior.

What about those people with irregular schedules?  Well, usually, that would be me.  For the last few years, I have normally been between 3-10 days late each month.  This app helped me with this by keeping me aware of my irregular cycle.  Combined with information about how to increase overall health, I used this awareness to motivate me to eat healthier, exercise more consistently, reduce sugar, stay away from soy, keep my blood sugars consistent, and to constantly work on stress management.  I have always had pretty terrible menstrual cramps that have diminished with better eating and exercise.  I spent the last three months working hard at my healthy habits and just had a cycle that included none of my typical cramps, nor ovarian and breast cyst swelling and pain, smoother moods, and an on time predictable schedule. It was heaven.  I’ve heard of women having this kind of cycle and I thought it would never happen to me.  I feel very much supported by this admittedly simple app and the daily dose of information it shares.

I also struggle with depression and anxiety and this app has helped me with that, too. When estrogen and progesterone start to drop about a week before our period, gloominess and worry can set in.  But what if you got a hint each day of what to expect with your hormones and behavior?  In the days leading up to menstruation, I used to get into a terrible depressed mood and be lost in my weary haze, always slightly unsure if I would ever crawl out.  Now, because I have a heads up and a reassurance that nature will help reverse the mood  in a few days, I work through this hard time of the month much better than ever before.  I drink herbal teas, wear loose clothing, and cut myself slack when it comes to chores and things that have to get done.

This app has also helped my relationship with my husband.  It has been hard on him to lose a generally happy and loving wife for about 10 days every month to extreme mood changes.  This app hasn’t just increased my understanding of what is going on with me, it has increased his understanding of what goes on with me.  “Oh, you aren’t crazy, it’s your hormones!”  Just kidding, he has never said that.  It also helps give him insight into how he can support me during that time.  I appreciate when he plans an outing out with the kids on one of the days I really need it, for example.  And I think he appreciates not having to freak out over my sudden crying at sappy animal commercials.   It’s also a bonus to be aware and take advantage of “sexy days”, days when hormones support the mood being just right.

There have been days when I feel like I can tackle a big project and the app knew about it.  I have felt like “a genius!” and the app knew about that, too.  (Too bad that doesn’t last more than a day or two) I no longer guilt myself on the few days I eat more than normal or the feelings of wanting to stay at home and chill with a book.  I jump up and embrace social outings on the days my body and brain are feeling more friendly and chatty and outgoing.  I deep clean the house when energy is up and cook simple and easy foods, otherwise known as microwave meals when it’s really low.

I never thought I’d rave about this kind of app but, it has brought me tremendous value and I recommend it to any woman who menstruates or any human who wants to better understand and support a woman who menstruates.  Just now I read my “hormonescope” for the day and it mentions that with progesterone and estrogen on a gentle rise after a previous dip, I’m supposedly feeling more creative flow and introspection but am physically jumbling my words so writing is a perfect thing to do today.  Voila.

Get it here!

Emotional Eating with Diabetes Book Review


Emotional Eating with Diabetes is Ginger Vieira’s 2nd book.  It tackles a subject all too familiar to people with diabetes and perhaps, not acknowledged enough by everybody else.

I’ve blogged about my struggles with food but not in great detail.  So I want to share my emotional eating story.

I’m a really emotional person and someone who has lived with type 1 for over 18 years (and through childhood and teenage years) so put that together and add in some 1st world body issues and you have someone who can review this book from a very personal place of experience.

And while I think I’ve got a good grip on my emotional eating issues (they don’t resurface often), I’m like an alcoholic in the sense that I need consistent reminders to stay on the right path and out of the dark side.  I really benefited from reading this book.  And I think I’ll read it every single year from now on for support.

It started when I was 12 and had only been living with type 1 for a year.  I would beg my mom for gum at the grocery store and then sell each piece at school for 10 cents, which I’d then pool together to buy an alternate lunch at school each day-a Little Debbie oatmeal cookie or fudge round.  I hated diabetes and the rules that came from my doctors so much that I was going to spite them any way I could.  So I ate what I wasn’t supposed to for lunch.

Then I started sneaking in candy bars and granola bars when no one was looking just to eat what diabetes wouldn’t let me eat.  (Do remember, this was before fast acting and 20-some hour insulin so back then we did have to abide by some rules that we don’t have any longer.)

I would binge and then feel like the worst person in the world.  And I developed a cycle of rebellion mixed with self-hate and a neglect for self-respect (ironically something I was all for in other manifestations).  People didn’t know I had a problem because I hid it.  And that was probably the first sign of a problem for me.

My health suffered, my weight went up, I had a hard time keeping up with such a destructive way of living.

Eventually (after years of hard work), I began to enjoy eating healthy and learned how to treat myself in a respectful way when it came to food.  And because food matters so much in diabetes, my health improved dramatically-no, my life improved dramatically.

If this sounds at all like you or you want to stop feeling obsessive about food, get this book.  It’s written in a straight forward but friendly way that will acknowledge all your fears and anxieties and help you through them.  This book will give you a guided path to where you want to be and show you how to be kind to yourself along the way.

I agree that the “can’t eat that” mentality is harmful. Ginger stresses that we make our own decisions and instead of telling ourselves we can’t have something, we either choose to or choose not to. And that’s how I do now with bread, rice, and pasta and other heavy carbs. I choose not to have them but I know that if I want them, I can have them. There is a difference between enjoying chicken and veggies  and eating that same dish while staring longingly at the rice side that is “forbidden”. Our minds are very susceptible to this kind of pressure and they are bound to crack.

Every now and then I eat my favorite food-ice cream, and I eat it really slowly, savoring every bite.  And I remember how I used to eat it so fast my tongue would burn and I would ask myself “What are you doing, you’re not even enjoying this?!”  That’s when I realize I’ve come a long way.  And yes, it took baby steps, the way Ginger describes in her book, but eventually we can get where we’re meant to be.  And the journey is so worthwhile.  This book is succinct, kind, and best of all I believe it’s effective.

I strongly recommend it.

Buy it here Smile

“Kids First, Diabetes Second” Book Review


“Kids First, Diabetes Second” is the first book by Leighann Calentine, who has a young daughter with type 1 diabetes and writes the popular blog

This book is for someone who has a child with type 1 diabetes.  Whether your child has just been diagnosed or has had diabetes for a while, this book would be a great resource to have at home.

Leighann seems to be one of those moms that is really organized and determined to figure things out.  Her child has only had type 1 for six years and yet she has worked to bring order and efficiency to their routine all the while, prioritizing her child’s experience of childhood.

I really respect these efforts.  I think it’s very sweet to see parents work so hard to acknowledge their child’s feelings and unique struggle while still taking care of their health with something as delicate and volatile as type 1 diabetes.

This book has helpful and practical information on many common scenarios involved in raising a child with type 1 diabetes like school, birthday parties, sports, and play dates.

I would definitely recommend it to anyone and everyone who has a child with diabetes.  Leighann is one smart cookie and I would expect anyone to get lots of value from this book.

That said, speaking as someone who did grow up with type 1 diabetes and is now an adult who can look back, I’d like to share a little bit from my experience.  It’s unique to me but perhaps not so uncommon and I think it may serve as a gentle reminder on the emphasis we may give diabetes:

Now that I’m 29, I can honestly say I don’t regret those times I felt left out at school.  They didn’t scar me.  The times I went to birthday parties and couldn’t have cake were not big deals.  Or maybe at the time they were to my young mind, but I learned to appreciate the true meaning in a get together, which was the friendship and fun and laughter involved.  Other kids may react differently to experiences like this so I understand that everything varies depending on the personality of one’s child.

Now that I’m 29, what I do regret are all the times my blood sugar was less than great as a child with diabetes.  Childhood is a short period of time compared with adulthood.  To face complications in young adulthood is a scary thought or reality that no cake or ice cream could ever relieve.  In adulthood we contemplate having a family and we need to be healthy to do this.  In adulthood we need to get through school or some kind of learning experience and be productive and build a life for ourselves and it really helps to be healthy.  For our bodies to grow appropriately in childhood and our brains to develop well we need stable blood sugar management.

I tricked my parents as a kid, so they’d see a good number on the meter when really, I had mixed my blood with saliva to shield them from a high.  But their efforts were very much on keeping our blood sugars controlled even if it meant missing out on something edible and delicious.

Looking back I feel as if it was a gift and a lesson to me and now I can say that I’m not worried about fitting in or missing out on foods and I’m more concerned with being true to my unique self and focusing on the bigger picture.

To me, part of the bigger picture is that our society and it’s habits around food are in such a dangerous state, that instead of figuring out how I can fit in it, I am figuring out how to live well despite it even if it means not enjoying many things.  Actually, I’ve learned new things to enjoy so that I don’t feel deprived, my blood sugars stay stable, and I’m also leading the way for my family.

I am teaching my two young children not to fit in to the American way of eating and many aspects of the American way of living because I don’t see it as healthy.  And I hope that makes it easier for them to be healthy and happy adults who instead of figuring out how to fit in, choose a better alternative.

So while I have NO DOUBT that Leighann will raise a healthy and intelligent daughter with diabetes and her book is full of information that is not to be missed, I hope you’ll keep in mind that as a child enters adulthood, diabetes may tie for first.  It ties for first in my life and I’m ok with that because I have found no other way to stay very healthy.  And that allows me so many more pleasures in what I hope will be a long, long life.

To buy this excellent book, go here.

“Sex and Diabetes” Book Review


Sex and diabetes can go together, I’ve learned, but I’ll be the first to admit there are unique challenges involved.  These were mostly private ruminations that I assumed were not common or normal until last year when I attended the Diabetes Sisters Conference for Women and was present at a discussion about the topic in a room full of nothing but women.

Then the truth came out.

Women were saying things like, “I know I’m low when 20 minutes has passed and I’m not getting anywhere” and “I’m tired of the monthly infections!” and “How can I increase…ya know, moisture?”  All the while, many other women nodded their heads in solemn agreement.

So I thought, “Oh, it’s the diabetes”.

Now this does not mean that if someone has diabetes that sex will be any different than if they didn’t have diabetes.  It just means that it’s likely that having diabetes will present a few tricky challenges in this department.

I’m not going to go on making some of you squeamishly uncomfortable but I will say that there is no shame in learning more about this subject.  In fact, it’s commendable because we know that in a relationship, sex IS important and the quality aspect absolutely matters.

So, I’d like to recommend the book, Sex and Diabetes, by Janis Rozler, RD, CDE, LDN and Donna Rice, MBA, BSN, RN, CDE.  All those random letters means they are professionals ;)

I actually got to hear Janis Rozler speak a few months ago.  She was awesome.  She understands what worries are going on in our heads and her attitude is a very empowered one that is infectious and encourages us to work on our issues with sex in relation to diabetes because it’s worth it!

Anyway, the book pleasantly surprised me.  It made me laugh, it touched on emotional intimacy, it shared interesting historic romance tidbits such as Cleopatra and Anthony’s relationship. (Talk about a power couple!)

The book gives a lot of practical information and tips such as how to talk to your doctor about issues and how to keep your body healthy.  It even shares information on supplements such as which are helpful and which are scams. The book also dives into some awesome relationship communication techniques that I really appreciated.

Sex and Diabetes goes into topics for women and for men and with an open, friendly tone and makes the point that there are many ways to work to make sex and intimacy better.  On that note, I love how sex and intimacy are not separated in this book.  The authors focus on sex in a meaningful relationship because only then can two people really work around any diabetes related challenges they may encounter.  And while there are challenges, there are solutions.  Indeed there are, and this book covers them all.

Great job, ladies.

You can buy the book here.

Gummy Owls for Weight Loss


I was sent some Gummy Owls to review.  I was really skeptical because they are for weight loss and I try to focus on avoiding weight loss supplements.  However, I would never judge a product without investigating it so I decided to learn about these Gummy Owls and try them out.

What they are is a natural aid for weight loss made out of yam fiber.  Essentially they make you feel full, naturally, so you don’t overeat at meals.  I appreciated that they don’t taste horrible, but they don’t taste like candy either (that would be a problem for some).

Basically, I would just take 3, 30 minutes before a meal with a tall glass of water.  They made me feel so full I could only eat half of my meal.  For those who need to lose a lot of weight, I can see how this may help that happen.  Unless someone doesn’t mind eating while feeling miserably full, that is.

I have been wanting to lose weight recently because a two month stint with birth control pills helped me use 50% more insulin than I’m used to and so I gained weight.  I tried these for a few weeks and lost several pounds, despite exercising less than I’m used to.

A word of caution with these.  You will want to follow the directions and take one at a time at first because you’ll want your body to adjust to small amount of sugar alcohols in the gummies.  Taking a handful right off the bat may cause you intestinal distress.  Nothing deadly, but you won’t appreciate the symptoms.

If your overeating is not caused by anxiety and you want to lose weight, this is a pretty helpful product that will certainly make it hard for you to eat more than a small, appropriate amount of food at each meal.  With that said, I’d recommend this for meals you’re eating that don’t include the healthiest of foods.

No stimulants, gluten, or scary chemicals.  Not bad at all.

Go here to order or learn more :)

Glucose Quick Sticks Review



By now you all may be inclined to think that “Sysy doesn’t do negative product reviews”.  But sadly, here’s one for ya.

I got some On the Go Glucose Quick Sticks recently which I tested out the other morning for a low I experienced.  This product boasts a 100% daily serving of Vitamin C and an “on the go” delivery method that needs no water.  There are 10 grams of glucose per serving (meaning you’d probably more than one to treat a low).  It comes in flavors such as watermelon and sour apple.

So the other day, I confirmed my low blood sugar and tore one of the sour apple sticks open.  They just so happen to resemble jumbo pixie sticks with a powdery fine filling.  I poured half of a stick in my mouth and gagged.  Something out there actually tastes  worse than glucose tablets.  Then, because I was low and shaky and my tongue was numb, I started to choke on the powdery glucose.  You sort of chuck it from the packet down your throat and it’s all too easy to choke on, in my opinion.  Maybe not the best for young children.  Or maybe just me.

The fun didn’t stop there.  Since I was shaky and flustered, I fumbled the darn thing (which is as light as a feather) and dropped it.  Powder filled the air and settled all over my desk, keyboard, and carpet.  The only thing it did right, once I opened a second packet and downed it, was get my sugar up quickly.  But the main ingredient is glucose and that’s it’s only job.

I feel like a glucose delivery product should taste decent and function well in a diabetic’s sweaty, trembling hands-because that’s our reality.

So if you see this at the store next to your glucose tablets, look away and grab your bottle of tabs.  Better yet, I recommend Glucolift glucose tablets.  Now there’s a well thought out product for a diabetic.

Sugar Bag Review and Giveaway!


Carolyn Jager has type 1 diabetes since childhood and was diagnosed just after her younger sister was also diagnosed.  (That story sounds familiar, doesn’t it Ana?)  Carolyn’s mother made her and her sister homemade cases that were fashionable and much less serious than what was available at the time and eventually, Carolyn decided all people with diabetes should have an option for a much more stylish and fun diabetes bag.  Luckily for us Sugar Medical Supply was born.  Ana and I received complementary diabetes cases (which do not dictate or sway the contents of these reviews).

These bags offer different fashionable designs, an easy to wipe interior and exterior, and fits the overwhelming majority of meters out there.  They have all the necessary compartments inside the case, but also an external pocket where you could put your cell or a cold pack or glucose tablets.

You can view all the designs and products here.

Ana’s Review:

After seeing the products that Sugar Medical Supply offers on their website, I was so excited to receive my very own “sugar bag” :]. First of all, the pattern is very cute and I love the colors. The size is convenient as well, not too small, not too large–I knew it would fit all of my supplies perfectly.

I have the tiny one touch meter, so I was worried that the featured universal strap wouldn’t be small enough to fit my meter, but it is! You just have to mess around with it for a bit. As you can see in the photos, I also fit my two insulin pens, a bottle of strips, a lancet, a spare battery, lancet and pen needles, and a small notepad.

I love it! I definitely recommend investing in a sugar bag. It has to be cute with that name!





Sysy’s Review:

The Sugar Bag reminds me of those really cute and colorful make up bags, only on the inside there are places for all your diabetes supplies. I appreciate the size of these bags-not too big nor small. (Funny, Ana and I agree on that and we wrote this separately without talking to each other about it.)

For women who want a discrete and non medical looking diabetes case that is also affordable, these would be a great purchase.  These bags make a really cool gift idea for anyone with diabetes.

Of all the bags I’ve been sent, these are probably the most practical ones.  The quality of the zippers and compartments are great and the patent pending, see through, stretch-to-fit-any-meter band is genius.  I can see myself using this bag anytime I go somewhere with my kids (which is a lot of places) because it’s tough, cute, casual, and holds everything.  These are not your typical boring case and are a great fit for everyday use.

And now for the giveaway!  If you’re interested in having one of these, please state in the comments that you want to be entered in the drawing, which will close in one week from today.

When you win, you can choose from this design:


or this one:



It’s your call :)

Good luck!

Natural Supplement for Nerve Pain Relief


I was sent a free sample of Neuropasil, Nerve Pain Formula recently.  It was developed by a renowned podiatrist who specializes in Medicine and Surgery of the foot and ankle, Dr. Enrico.  I’m all for natural products so I was eager to see what was in this formulation.

You take one tablet twice a day and get a cocktail of vitamins and minerals, including alpha lipoic acid and inositol.  These ingredients all promote optimal nerve health and supposedly you start to experience results in 2 weeks with maximum relief in 4-6 weeks.  I’m not sure I have enough nerve pain in order to experience “relief” since all I ever get once in a while (if I wear high heels) is a twinge of nerve pain under my right toe.  But I can say that after 3 weeks of taking this I haven’t felt any twinges of pain.  So that’s cool :)

I asked Dr. Enrico a few questions about this product:

Who is Neuropasil for?

Neuropasil is a nutritional supplement that people can use to manage nerve pain and support nerve health. Anyone who suffers from nerve pain, or neuropathy, may benefit from this supplement, including people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia, chronic neck and back pain, neuropathy associated with chemotherapy, among others.

Can people get the ingredients for Neuropasil in their diet?

Theoretically yes, but realistically no.  Neuropasil contains a proprietary blend of B vitamins, minerals like Alpha Lipoic Acid and supplements. While these ingredients are naturally occurring in certain green vegetables, in order benefit from these you would have to consume a very large amount of these foods. Its best to incorporate a nutritional supplement with these ingredients into your daily diet to get the nutrients that you need.

Aside from taking this supplement, what else can people with nerve pain do to help their symptoms?

In relation to diabetic neuropathy, the best thing to do is keep your blood sugar under control and to exercise, which keeps you healthy and releases endorphins which can help ease pain.

Thanks, Doc, for answering those questions.

Here is more info:


Facebook page:

Have any of you tried this product?  What did you think?  I know our feet are really important to us :)


Why Scary Diabetic Ads Waste Our Money

Health Dept Fake Amputee.JPEG-092f7

Why are ad campaigns done in this fashion?  I thought about it for a while last night and came to the conclusion that campaigns like this, which motivate based on fear, are decided upon in the same manor a toddler falls to the ground in a tantrum when he is so overwhelmed and under-equipped with words that he can’t get his message across.  In other words, this seems like a pitiful move of desperation.

It’s always a mistake when we act hastily and sole based on emotions.  In the case of this ad in which an obese man has digitally had his leg amputated and the point made on the add that portions have grown and so has type 2 diabetes, the connection is brutal.  The ad states that type 2 diabetes leads to amputations.  It can…but give me a break.

Let me put my self 10 years back into my once very overweight body.  For real.  I’d show you a picture but I think I burned them all.  Now, I’ll imagine seeing this ad for the first time and ask myself what I think:

I’m completely aware about my weight, thank you very much.  I’m already scared senseless of diabetes complications.  I know I need to eat less.  I also know that I’m hungry all the time…but I don’t know why.  I know that I don’t feel well and am not nearly as happy as I could be.  This ad just depresses me and reminds me that a soft drink or other cheap drive thru treat will cheer me up for at least 10 minutes.  This ad makes me feel like a baby who has a pointed wagging finger in front of me while being threatened with a spanking.

I had to physically, mentally, and emotionally hit rock bottom and crawl on my hands and knees searching for information that would save my life and change it entirely for the better.  I discovered information online about healthy lifestyle habits.  I began making changes slowly.  I exercised more, I ate different foods, and most importantly, I began forcing myself to change my thinking from overly negative to positive.  Positive thoughts and these lifestyle changes began to slowly help lift me out of my depression, which helped me do what I needed to do-like test my blood sugars and exercise, and shun junk food.  I lost weight, nerve pain in my feet disappeared, I changed jobs, I improved relationships, and I felt hopeful about my future with diabetes.  My entire life changed because of positive information helping me, guiding me towards a new way of thinking and living.  I would have loved a billboard containing a hint of the information I had to dig up to find.  I would have loved for it to be more accessible to me.

The ads that inspire fear in people who are already fearful and suffering do nothing.  NOTHING except harm our psyches even more than they are already being harmed by our lack of health and all that a lack of health leads to.

So I propose NYC and those in charge of similar campaigns for change stop panicking and making ads like chickens with their heads cut off- “Let’s tell them (particularly Latinos) that they better start downsizing their soft drinks or they’ll lose their legs and worsen our economy even more!  Let’s tell them before we’re all really screwed!”  How about we start thinking solidly and compassionately about what really motivates people.  Hire people with diabetes as consultants.  Hire psychologists who can help you determine how people get motivated.  Stop deciding for yourselves that informing people about the worst case scenarios is going to slap them straight into the right actions.  I’m sure that method doesn’t work on you.

You know…hope and positively stated, encouraging information works a lot better.

Treato Offers Prescription Side Effect Help


I’ve learned of a pretty cool website called Treato which helps organize and combine different people’s experiences with prescription drug side effects.  You can go here to watch a short video that explains how it works.  It’s free and I tried it out with one of my prescriptions and was pleased at how organized and limitless the information that came up was.  For those of us with a chronic illness, I find that it can be overwhelming to deal with prescription drug side effects because we have to figure out how to separate those symptoms from the symptoms we sometimes get from our illness.  For example, I had trouble recently figuring out if high blood sugar was causing dry mouth or if the new prescription I was taking was the culprit and Treato helped clue me in.

I asked Noam Mantel, who works with Treato, a few questions to learn more:

Have you received any feedback from the medical community regarding the safety and efficacy of Treato?

We are pleasantly surprised to receive such positive feedback from the medical community. We genuinely thought the process of having the professionals on board with the idea would take much longer than it has. Today, Social Media plays such a big role in health that people are taking it very seriously, including the pharmaceutical companies. A great example of positive feedback is a blog post written by Andrew Spong which really blew us away ( .

One of the issues we have come across is info validation. We hope to start integrating medical databases with our personal experiences database so our users can benefit from the best of both worlds at once. We sometimes see raised eyebrows but, especially with professionals, once they see thousands of real patient experiences on one condition or medication, it’s extremely hard to ignore.

What are some practical ways someone might benefit from using Treato?

This is an interesting question because you can take the system to so many places and we hear about new applications all the time. The most obvious way is to get more information on a medication. If you’re already taking a medication and are getting side effects, the site is a great form of assurance that you aren’t the only one getting them. If this is the case, you can compare your medication to similar ones to try and find a medication that less people have said to cause your side effect. Once you’ve found a few potential alternative medications, you can read people’s experiences with switching from your current medication.

Now, this was just an example of people who are already taking medications. People use it to find information about medications they’ve been prescribed, look up medications for recently diagnosed conditions and so on. On a more personal note, I used the site this week for something much less serious. My eyelids were burning when I was exercising so I looked it up on Treato and found out what other people are calling it. This way, I can come up to my physician and say “I think I may have so and so”. This specific application may not have saved my life, but it did make it easier.

Let’s say I look up my medication on Treato and discover that many people have had the same reaction to the medication that I”m having and let’s say I read that several people found relief taking a different but similar medication. How should one go about mentioning this to their doctor for consideration?

We understand how much more difficult it is for doctors today. Patients are coming into their office with printouts of the research they did at home and we’ve heard that some doctors (not all of course) do not care for this. We think the best way to approach a doctor with this is to print out the general statistics you found and then a few specific posts that got your attention. Speaking with doctors, we found that they would respond better to people’s real stories as opposed to medical information from sites. If you show them a few posts of people doing better on a different medication, chances are they will listen.

Of course, if they’re not convinced, you can always show them to the site so they can research the matter further themselves.


Here’s to making sense of our symptoms and prescription drug side effects!

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