The Case for Diabetes Cure Hope

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It takes bravery and guts to hope.  It’s a leap of faith.  There’s a vulnerability in it.  I love those qualities in people so I always encourage myself to feel hopeful about things.  Even if I’d rather put myself in a more protective state and cross my arms, shake my head, and tell myself that hoping is for ignorant suckers.

It’s not.

It’s beautiful and scary and takes patience.  I also believe it sets a very particular vibe that positively touches everyone and everything around it.

This week we heard two news stories come out about diabetes research.  I find them both uplifting because it gives me the feeling that we’re moving in the right direction, that we’re learning more things, and I’m reminded with this news that researchers are working on figuring diabetes out.  All that encourages me.  I’m doing my part by taking care of myself, and they are doing theirs by making strides in research-it’s excellent teamwork.

If I put myself in the frame of mind of a person whose child has type 1 diabetes, and I can’t feel what they feel, only I try to imagine more or less- I admit I feel an overwhelming sense of urgency and desperation.  I have a child that’s very allergic to some common foods and I see that as much easier to handle than a child with type 1 diabetes.  And even with my situation I feel desperation.  I’m anxiously awaiting relief of my way of life which includes more fear, home cooking, and limitations for my daughter and our entire family than we’d otherwise have.  I’m working on this.  I’m constantly trying to keep fear in check, to recognize that home cooking is healthier and cheaper anyway, and trying to see that limitations are only what we view them as.  In other words, I don’t live by the ocean and as a result, don’t get to see it often.  But I don’t view that as a limitation, it’s just the way it is.  Well, we don’t eat out due to allergies and it’s just the way it is for us.  The real tragedy in our case would be lack of food or epi-pens in a time of need.  So perspective and gratitude is huge in our day to day happiness.

However, type 1 in children is a complicated beast that puts a child in danger 24/7.  Is there anything else like that for a child outside of other serious conditions and extremely harsh living environments?  What I’m saying is that the seemingly irrational fear of parents of children with type 1 is something that really deserves our understanding, patience, and compassion.  Hope in their hands regarding a cure for type 1 diabetes is a very fragile thing.  And I’m just saying that I recognize that and cannot judge that position.

On the other hand as someone who made it through childhood with type 1, I feel much less fear and desperation for a cure for myself and unchecked I actually feel a tinge of pride and arrogance about how I’ve made it without a cure and all while being told every five years that the cure was right around the corner.  What did that do to me?  At first I felt like a ragdoll in a child’s hands.  Then I allowed it to give me a little bit of a shell.  A rigid, chilly shell.  But over the years I’ve let that go because like I said earlier, it’s a beautiful thing to feel hope.  I prefer being soft, pliable, open, and able to adapt to change.  I hated how at 13 years old, I felt embarrassed to show positive emotions because of how that emotion could turn sour all of a sudden and someone might witness that and I’d publically lose face.  I secretly preferred and longed to get myself back to a time when I would hear happy news, smile and leap for joy and then have my hopes dashed and suddenly pout and sigh from a sense of loss but soon get over it.  Am I saying I’d like to be like a child again?  Kind of yeah.  I watch my toddlers and am constantly amazed at their range of emotions in such a short time span.  They feel what they feel when they feel it.  Then they let it out, let it go, and move on.  It’s healthy and sweet and vulnerable and I admire and cherish this about them.  I also can’t help but notice that most children do this and it’s partly what allows them to generally learn so quickly, be so happy, and forgive so easily.

So for those of you with a bit of snark about the news that seems blown out of proportion or who feel that you’ve lost all hope and trust because of past promises about a cure, I understand that, too.  But, I wish for you to let go some of the pain from the past because well…it seems like a miserable weight to carry around.  Hope is light and energetic and doubt and sarcasm seem like the opposite.

No matter what, those of us with diabetes have it right now and that means we have to deal with it.  It begs to be managed and so our best bet is to live in the moment with it.  Not easy, I know, but what’s the alternative?  After all, nothing about having hope means ignoring reality-that would be more accurately described as delusion or assumption or arrogance.

But allowing hope to help us through our reality, well that’s it’s greatest purpose isn’t it?

Feb 2013 Test Results and Why It’s Good to Get the Details

I haven’t posted an A1c in a while.  Let’s face it I haven’t posted anything in a while but in that time frame I’ve received emails like, “So, you’re A1c is suddenly not good enough to share?!”  No…I just haven’t made it to the endo, lately.  Sometimes that low $30 co-pay IS a deterrent.  That and fear of course.  So I finally did go and here are the results.  My A1c is 5.9, the highest it’s been in the past 6-7 years.  I drank regular coffee before my appointment to see if I could bump up my blood pressure since lately it’s been in normal range as long as I exercise regularly and avoid caffeine and sure enough, I was 130/80.  I got it tested again a few days later while having had no caffeine and I was 110/71.  WOW, is all I have to say.  And no more regular coffee for me, ever!

About my A1c, in order to be fair and transparent, it sounds fantastic but, it’s a reflection of more swings in blood sugar than my last A1c which was 5.7 so I really have more work to do- even though it wouldn’t appear that way.  And that’s the point with my sharing my A1c and the other tests along with that.  Because if you’ll notice below where I post pictures of my results, I have an MCHC test in high range and in my case it means Vit B 12 and Folic acid deficiencies (having ruled out liver disease as a possibility).  This winter was tough financially so we didn’t purchase many foods high in those vitamins and when we did I left my portion to my kids since they are at a more crucial state of development.  I eat a lot of vegetables but meat and seafood sure seem to boost vitamin B 12 levels more than anything else.  So I will try to include more of those foods now for sure.  That and get all of us on a multi-vitamin.  The other thing I want to mention is that it seems that having a deficiency in B12 and Folic Acid affects red blood cell life (from what I read).  Our A1c test reflects our blood sugars over the past 2-3 months because that’s how long those cells live before they are replaced with new ones.  If mine are dying more quickly my A1c would reflect a period of time less than 2-3 months.  So there is that.  Though I’m not sure about how all that works.

By the way, I found this out by asking my doctor’s office for my detailed results as you see below.  Otherwise they send me a sheet of paper stating what my A1c is and letting me know that everything else is “normal”.  When I got my paperwork this time around I asked for all the exact test result data and found out those vitamin deficiencies (good to know so I can actually do something about it) and I found out a high bilirubin count which in my case (due to unshared personal data) seems like a genetic thing and leads me to attempt some liver detox to see if that helps (like juicing beets).  It doesn’t seem to be anything serious except it possibly causes chronic fatigue and mild jaundice and that’s no fun.

So anyway, here are the results.  I just want to point out that at some point my triglycerides, cholesterol, and thyroid levels were all abnormal and now they’re not.  Not always, but often, these things can absolutely be helped with changes in lifestyle habits.  Worked for me and it’s something I keep putting effort into.

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A Day in the Life of a Type 2 Diabetic

I wrote a post a while back called Which Diabetes is Worse?  I had a thoughtful response from a type 2 diabetic, Christine, who felt strongly about how both type 1 and type 2 diabetics have it rough.  I don’t know what it’s like to have type 2 diabetes so I asked her to write from her perspective.  I really appreciate Christine doing this because it’s always important to be reminded how all of us are dealing with challenges unique to our own journey in life.  Here’s what it’s like for this type 2:

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Christine and her family

A while ago, Sysy invited me to do a guess post on the “The Day in the Life of a Type 2 Diabetic.”  I don’t know what it is like to be T1, so I can’t really say what is different, except for maybe dreams and goals.  From everything I have heard, when you are a Type 1, you became such at a pretty young age, Pre-teen even.  I could be wrong, but this is before a person has full expectations of their life and what it would be like.  When I was a teen-ager, I may have known what I wanted to be, but I was still planning and letting my life unfold.

I became diabetic at 25.  I already had a life and thought I knew how it was going to be.  I was living that life.  I was married and had a toddler.  I was finishing my degree and knew where I was going.  I had a solid plan and saw no turns in the road.  I wanted 6 children.  I was going to be an active stay-at-home mom, who did all kinds of fun projects.  I was a contributing member of society and actively participated at my church.  I was a “yes” girl.  I thought I could do anything if I put my mind to it.  As a person I had fully developed my habits and tendencies.  I was a creative person who didn’t plan well and lived in the moment.  I did what I wanted, when I wanted, to.

So, when my life changed at diagnosis, I had to do more then develop new habits and routines, I had to change who I was, who I had become over those special years.  It wasn’t even until today in fact that I realized, that I had to rewrite an entirely new life for my self.  All my dreams and goals, had to be revised.  Everything I expected and planned for had to change.

It is hard to change who you are when you are already done with the preparatory years. It’s scary.  Who am I now?  What can I do?  How will my life be? Some answers are clean cut.  The dream of 6 children is not going to work out.  But can I still be that mother I worked so hard to become?  Some days I am so tired, it feels impossible.  I am 29 now and I am still trying to figure myself out, with this new life.  I have to change me, I have to become consistent in my routine.  This feels boring and against my nature.  I feel like I am still on the turn in the road, unable to see the road ahead of me, hoping the road continues.  It is exhausting and I feel deflated and defeated a lot of the time.

That is what it is like to be Type 2, at-least when you are a young T2.  I feel physically and emotionally tired and anxious all the time and I can remember what it is like to be healthy, which almost seems like a curse instead of a blessing.  In some ways it’s like being a teen-ager with an adult life, because I have to find myself all over again. On the other hand, I did have that time where I got to live my life without this weight over me and that is a blessing.  I had a typically teenage experience and didn’t receive my trials until I was older.  So, that I can be thankful for.

What is the same?  I don’t think anything is the same for anyone?  We all have struggles.  One might be great at maintaining their blood sugars where another is not.  While one might be afraid of needles and the other had no problem with it.  Some might be good at keeping a routine and some might be good at keeping an optimistic point of view.  We all have out own personal trials with this disease.  No one has it worse or better, it is just different for each of us.  It may feel lonely and isolating at times, because people don’t see “the sweetness within,” and how it can affect a person, but we T1 or T2 diabetics, we know and we can support each other.

Thanks for opening up with us Christine!  Comments and discussion encouraged everyone!

Emotional Eating with Diabetes Book Review

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Emotional Eating with Diabetes is Ginger Vieira’s 2nd book.  It tackles a subject all too familiar to people with diabetes and perhaps, not acknowledged enough by everybody else.

I’ve blogged about my struggles with food but not in great detail.  So I want to share my emotional eating story.

I’m a really emotional person and someone who has lived with type 1 for over 18 years (and through childhood and teenage years) so put that together and add in some 1st world body issues and you have someone who can review this book from a very personal place of experience.

And while I think I’ve got a good grip on my emotional eating issues (they don’t resurface often), I’m like an alcoholic in the sense that I need consistent reminders to stay on the right path and out of the dark side.  I really benefited from reading this book.  And I think I’ll read it every single year from now on for support.

It started when I was 12 and had only been living with type 1 for a year.  I would beg my mom for gum at the grocery store and then sell each piece at school for 10 cents, which I’d then pool together to buy an alternate lunch at school each day-a Little Debbie oatmeal cookie or fudge round.  I hated diabetes and the rules that came from my doctors so much that I was going to spite them any way I could.  So I ate what I wasn’t supposed to for lunch.

Then I started sneaking in candy bars and granola bars when no one was looking just to eat what diabetes wouldn’t let me eat.  (Do remember, this was before fast acting and 20-some hour insulin so back then we did have to abide by some rules that we don’t have any longer.)

I would binge and then feel like the worst person in the world.  And I developed a cycle of rebellion mixed with self-hate and a neglect for self-respect (ironically something I was all for in other manifestations).  People didn’t know I had a problem because I hid it.  And that was probably the first sign of a problem for me.

My health suffered, my weight went up, I had a hard time keeping up with such a destructive way of living.

Eventually (after years of hard work), I began to enjoy eating healthy and learned how to treat myself in a respectful way when it came to food.  And because food matters so much in diabetes, my health improved dramatically-no, my life improved dramatically.

If this sounds at all like you or you want to stop feeling obsessive about food, get this book.  It’s written in a straight forward but friendly way that will acknowledge all your fears and anxieties and help you through them.  This book will give you a guided path to where you want to be and show you how to be kind to yourself along the way.

I agree that the “can’t eat that” mentality is harmful. Ginger stresses that we make our own decisions and instead of telling ourselves we can’t have something, we either choose to or choose not to. And that’s how I do now with bread, rice, and pasta and other heavy carbs. I choose not to have them but I know that if I want them, I can have them. There is a difference between enjoying chicken and veggies  and eating that same dish while staring longingly at the rice side that is “forbidden”. Our minds are very susceptible to this kind of pressure and they are bound to crack.

Every now and then I eat my favorite food-ice cream, and I eat it really slowly, savoring every bite.  And I remember how I used to eat it so fast my tongue would burn and I would ask myself “What are you doing, you’re not even enjoying this?!”  That’s when I realize I’ve come a long way.  And yes, it took baby steps, the way Ginger describes in her book, but eventually we can get where we’re meant to be.  And the journey is so worthwhile.  This book is succinct, kind, and best of all I believe it’s effective.

I strongly recommend it.

Buy it here Smile

If it Works for Oprah…

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“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.”
~ Epicurus

Not everyone likes Oprah but most of us agree that she has worked herself to where she is versus being handed everything.  My mom saved an article for me where she talks about gratitude.  I was amazed to read what Oprah considers the most life changing thing she has done.  For many years she has kept a journal and each morning she has written down 5 things she is grateful for.  It forces a person into a habit of looking at what they do have versus what they don’t.  She goes on to talk about gratitude and the unique power it can have on our lives.

I’ve read in many places that gratitude is the single most transformative thing we can use in life.  It begs positivity, streamlines focus away from feelings of inadequacy, and brings with it a healthy rush of feelings to the body that support positive decisions.

I believe that those of us with diabetes who practice gratitude on a consistent basis really benefit.  Not only does having a chronic illness usually cause us to be more aware and sensitive towards the plights of others but couple that with gratitude and you have an amazing potential for a life filled with meaning and depth beyond many people’s reach.

So while I’m not grateful for having diabetes, I am grateful for what I’ve learned and who I am because of it.  And when my blood sugar is 102 and I feel perfectly healthy, I feel like I’m in heaven while others don’t even recognize the beauty and freedom of feeling great.  I could feel jealous of non diabetics but I choose to feel grateful for the advantage of my perspective.  It makes life better.  But it is a choice and a habit.  I think writing down things we’re grateful for is an excellent idea.  Thanks, Oprah.

A Diabetes Art Showing

My sister and fellow type 1 diabetic, Ana, had her first art showing recently on campus of her school, James Madison University.

The theme she chose was diabetes so I really wanted to share pictures of it with you all.

One of Ana’s professors expressed worry that this theme of diabetes somehow limited Ana’s potential to perhaps show her range. I would like to respectfully disagree. Diabetes is a 24/7 condition that affects every single cell in our bodies, has no cure, and has mental, social, emotional repercussions. Diabetes has no limits and neither does art.  Art is expressed in many forms and has the potential to teach, inspire, and move us deeply.  I have diabetes and know my sister but was still very surprised and moved from this collection and I know that many people without diabetes were really impacted and informed by this art work.

Ana was extraordinarily brave to open herself up in this way and allow us a chance to learn from and relate to her as a person living with diabetes. What is it they say?  That in showing our vulnerabilities we reveal our strength and courage?  Well, I agree and I’m really proud to call her my sister.

Enjoy :)

 

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Her showing starts with a setting for visitors including her business cards and a jar of strips which gives a visual for just how many of these things we go through and how many finger pricks we endure.

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This one is called “ketoacidosis”. Ana has only visited the hospital once in almost 19 years with type 1 diabetes and it was for ketoacidosis as a teenager. It came up fast and seemingly out of nowhere and scared the heck out of us. She recalls that she didn’t really know what ketoacidosis was nor did she realize how dangerous it could be.

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Here, Ana says this represents the time between her hospital visit for ketoacidosis and the time she began these paintings.  So activities and events are shown below and collectively demonstrate what is her very “Normal Life”, as the painting is called.

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This one stumped me until Ana explained it.  It’s the third in this series of four paintings and is called “Attack”.  During the time of Ana’s “normal life” she read up on ketoacidosis to understand it better.  She read about how serious it was and then went days waking up in the middle of the night with what sounds like anxiety attacks.  She says she felt her heart beating strongly (which is why it’s enlarged in the painting) and felt she was being choked and sick to her stomach with fear at the realization of what diabetes could cause to happen.

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Ana ends with a piece called “Thank You” which represents the support and love from family and friends.

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“Insulin is Not a Cure”

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This one is called “I Can See It Happening” and represents Ana’s fear of diabetes complications, namely, blindness.  This is a strong fear for her because of how she loves to paint and make art and is a generally visually oriented person.  But the squeezing out tears is also indicative of the many frustrations from living with diabetes.

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I don’t remember this but days after Ana’s type 1 diabetes diagnosis at age 3, she caught the flu!  Here are two framed sheets of notebook paper where our dad charted out Ana’s blood sugars trying to understand  type 1 diabetes and help take care of a young daughter with the flu all at the same time.  She was still in the honeymoon period at this point.

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A wall of thoughts and feelings about diabetes…

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Ana asked people with and without diabetes a few questions and framed the questions and the responses she received.  Here are a few:

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Ana’s answers to those questions:

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Our friend Jennifer Brannock’s response:

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Our mom’s response:

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Our Dad’s:

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Our 12 year old brother:

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From Ana’s boyfriend (ironically, also my husband’s youngest brother):

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Here is one girl’s heartbreaking response (let’s leave her some encouraging comments!)

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From Patty Keller:

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More people from the DOC responded:

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Don’t we know about ketones and strips…

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The beta cell is quite lovely:

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and in color:

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I remember taking this picture one summer. Ana and our other sister Sara were in the basement roller blading to music. Our mom called down the stairs, “Ana! Check!” Ana dutifully shoved off her skates and ran upstairs to check. I thought about how our reality was so strange, yet so normal and I took a picture of her while checking her blood sugar. I didn’t tell her to “say cheese”, she did that all on her own. After this photo she went back to roller blading and I was secretly inspired by her ability to carry diabetes so gracefully.  Even though the hardship of diabetes is present, I think this picture reflects the potential we all have as people with or without diabetes.

In other words, we do what we need to do, smile…and carry on with life.

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Thank you so much for viewing/reading this post.  It’s the next best thing to having had you all over to the art show in person.

We’re eager to hear what you think in the comments :)

 

XOXO, Sysy and Ana Morales

The Way Kids See It

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For many of us with diabetes, our children will grow up watching us check our blood sugars, inject insulin or be connected to a pump, desperately shove sugar into our mouths, and not find any bit of it strange.

And the only time it becomes something they stop and ponder may be when a friend or someone from the outside asks questions about it.  “What’s your mom doing?”  “What’s wrong with her-is she sick?”

They will explain we have diabetes and that we have to check our blood sugars and take medicine for it.  It won’t even be a big deal.

Their reality of our having diabetes should be ours.

Focusing on wishing we didn’t have diabetes only hinders us and distracts us from all the diabetes related decisions we need to make every day.  We need all our energy for managing this thing.

For our children, it just “is” this way.  And for us to gain full acceptance of our diabetes we can try looking at it the same way, it just “is”.  That’s our reality.  Now what are we going to do with it?

Or better yet, what example are we going to give our kids about facing our reality and living life to the fullest?

2013 New Year’s Resolutions

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“Destiny is not a matter of chance; it is a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.”
~William Jennings Bryan

First off, Happy New Year!  I hope you feel excitement at the anticipation of a new year filled with wonderful possibilities!

New Year’s resolutions are pointless if they don’t include a specific plan and a time fence.  For the third year in a row I’m going to follow Leo Babauta’s 6 Change Method for making some real improvement this year.

January/February resolution:  To successfully do my peer talks in Spanish

You know those people who can speak a foreign language with their native accent in tow and make loads of grammar mistakes and just not care?  Yeah, I’m not one of them.  Having grown up with Spanish speaking parents makes me feel a bit of shame about my not being able to speak like a native.  But, I love hearing people with accents so why do I hate my own gringa accent?  Anyway, I have two presentations I’m going to give people with diabetes in Spanish in January and February and I want to do them well and preferably not sweat buckets while my blood sugars sky rocket.

The plan?  Practice, practice, practice!  Rather than procrastinate, procrastinate, procrastinate.

I normally write out all my month’s goals but I feel like I don’t know what’s needed until I get there so I will be figuring that out along the way.

Wish me luck!/Deseame suerte!

What are your New Year’s resolutions?  Remember, they don’t have to be carried off in the wind as a memory of what you would have liked to do.  Just make a plan.  Want support?  I coach people with all sorts of things they want to accomplish.  Email me at sysy@thegirlsguidetodiabetes.com to set up a free consultation.

10 Random Things from the Author of The Girl’s Guide to Diabetes

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Hi!  I’ve been away from the blog longer than ever since it started 3.5 years ago.  That ends today.  But, here is what has been consuming my thoughts and making writing about diabetes a lower priority:

1.  Travelling with diabetes is challenging.  I’ve really been working at getting the knack of it.  I don’t want it to be bad for my health you know?  The other day, I tried my best to check my blood sugar in line at the airport where you put your things in cubbies to get scanned and just as I put the blood in the strip the scanner sucked my cubby with my meter in it inside to be scanned and I had to ask the lady at the scanner, “Excuse me, what number do you see on my meter?”  She lifted the scanner flap and peeked inside and said, “911 I think?”  Huh?!  It came out a few seconds later and I saw a 116, phew!  People behind me looked a little nervous and I don’t blame them.  One TSA agent said, “We need to do a pat down, do you mind?”  I said, “Of course you need to now, go ahead.”  What was I doing checking at the most inappropriate time?  I felt really off like I might be very low and ready to pass out and didn’t want to hesitate with checking because I had to run to the next gate so I felt I needed to just do it then.  I get sick to my stomach with flying so I take dramamine and that makes me kind of loopy…but I still love it.  Flying that is, not the dramamine.

2.  My favorite number is two.  I know that’s random but-My dad was diagnosed with bladder cancer.  It’s really scary because even though surgery removed the tumor, the likelihood of return is very high.  I’m making him vegetable juices and hoping that does something to help.  This has made me have a heart to heart with myself about my diabetes because I can do so much to make my outcome a good one-I really need to remember that and be grateful for it.

3.  My kids being 3.5 and still at home with me all day is driving me nuts.  I hate feeling nagged because I really am very happy to have them with me, to read books and play games all day, mold their minds into caring, open, patient people, watch them impressed as they have expert command of the computer, but at the same time, I know I’m not enough.  And I’m not sure how to solve this which leads me to:

4.  My husband Alex and I are having a hard time deciding where to live.  We can’t decide whether to rent or buy, to get a house or condo or loft.  And its because what we want doesn’t exist where we live.  We want to buy a really small place (so that the cost is low and the space is just for basic needs) and then we want to use our extra money to eat well (for health’s sake) and to travel (for our kid’s mind’s sake).  And I don’t mean travel abroad, I mean anywhere.  Right now just driving to a neighboring town to visit isn’t doable because rent is so high (since we want a nice and safe area-gee are we just asking for too much?).  When we walk out of our front door we want to be around people, a community.  I live in a place that is too large to be a town and too small to be a city and so we don’t have any of the best of either world.  Others would disagree but I must be ambitious because I want more.  Alex does, too.  We’re lonely.  There, I said it.  My kids are lonely.  School is coming for them and I’m sure they will love it.  Maybe that’s all we have to wait for.  In the meantime daycare/preschool is too expensive here and we make too much to get federal aid for it-nor do I want it.  Stubborn Sysy strikes again.

5.  I’ve noticed there is a back lash online towards people who are health coaches or something similar.  Usually, the most upset are those who studied for years to get an accreditation of some kind.  I can understand.  However, what someone like myself does as a health coach is in no way a threat to what a dietitian or a nurse or a diabetes educator does.  Think of what a coach does?  Supports, cheers, listens, encourages.  I’ll write more about this soon.  And I’d like for people out there to know that vocation has a lot to do with how good one will be at their job.  Just think, we all took math in high school but how many of us could teach others that math?  I couldn’t to save my life.  My health coaching training took one intense year but I’ve been reading and training on the subject my whole life as if I grew up knowing what I wanted to do only not knowing it actually existed until recently.  And I think that goes for many people of all types of professions and work.  I may write more about this later in detail but for now, I just want to say that health coaches don’t take the place of the other health care professions, they just want to help alongside of them.  And there is a need for them otherwise so many people wouldn’t be calling us for help and leaving happy and satisfied.  And we deserve to make a living off of it because we’re working hard, helping people (isn’t that the point?), and can’t do our work as homeless people.  We don’t have huge loans to pay back but that’s not our fault.  We do have to struggle more to find work since so many are still skeptical however.

6.  I’d like to remind you all of the website Guerilla Goodness.  It’s awesome and inspiring and really cheers me up this time of year.  Great ideas here for spreading around secret acts of kindness-which I agree with the author-do change everything.

7.  I’ve been thinking about how to reconcile my love of fashion and quality clothing while not spending much and while buying from small businesses and while keeping my closet simple.  A friend from France emailed me explaining what most girls there do:  They buy a few pieces a year that they carefully select while walking around town, making sure they fit perfectly and they get shoes that are comfortable but exactly what they are looking for.  Then, they wear the same few outfits over and over and over.  It keeps things minimal, lets them wear what they love, and keeps costs down.  And at the end of the year, they have completely worn out their shoes and clothes and can start anew the next year.  I read the same thing in a book recently, too.  Just thought I’d share because I think too many of us have too much clothes and we don’t even love most of it and then our closets are overwhelming, we’ve spent too much, and for what?

8.  There is a website I want to share.  My type 1 friend Cynthia Zuber is on a holistic health journey.  She is doing great and it’s been very inspiring to get to know her and see what all she does to regain her health and maximize it.  She shares the most delicious recipes I’ve seen and just want to let you all know to check out Diabetes Light.

9.  Did you get the flu shot this year?  I didn’t though I can understand why some do.  I haven’t in many years.  So far, so good.  Things have been great since getting my Vitamin D levels up with Vitamin D3 supplements.  Oh and frequent hand washing.  Just wanted to share.

10.  My most popular post is about nerve damage reversal.  I am submitting an update here that as of December 2012, I have less foot pain than I have ever had.  In fact, I have had none this year.  I don’t know why.  I wonder if running bothers me (I’ve been doing more yoga and walking and less running).  For years I had tons of foot pain, tons!  Then as I regained control of my blood sugars the pain increased (which doctors told me could be due to healing of nerves)  Then the pain went away for 99% of the time.  I credit this lack of pain now to well managed blood sugars.  I thought I would halt damage by improving my sugars but it seems I’ve reversed some because of the lack of pain?  Pretty fantastic what great blood sugars can do.  Makes the discipline and healthy lifestyle so worth it.  Even if I just do it most of the time Winking smile  Anyway, I share because the possibility of less pain is a big motivator.

Take care, all.

xoxo,

Sysy

Diabetes Cost Me This Much This Year

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I just did the math on how much money I spent this 2012 for my diabetes.  I included doctor visits and labs and prescriptions and even glucose tablets.

It came out to $1000.  And I’d like to quickly note that if I ate the standard American diet (thus needing more insulin and strips) I’d have spent almost $2000.

Anyway, not bad, right?  Or is it?  I’ve had diabetes so long I don’t even know anymore.

Recalling what others mention spending I think I’m one of the lucky ones.  Still, I know an extra $1000 would have done my family some good.

But mom being healthy does the family tons of good.

I’m really curious, how much did you spend on your diabetes this year?

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