Tag Archives: children with diabetes

One For Every Year

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My most memorable thoughts about diabetes for each year with diabetes, starting with the first year as an 11 year old:

1994  “I can do this.  No, I won’t go to diabetes camp, I’m just like everyone else, I’ll go to regular camp.”  “Ok, regular camp was fun but I thought I was going to die”.

1995  “Alright, I don’t like this at all.  I’m not sure I can do this.”

1996  “I can’t do this!  But I don’t want anyone to know…”  “I just want to be normal”.

1997  “Recovering from a gum grafting surgery.  So this is what happens when I try to be normal.  Not fair.”

1998  “I wonder what boys think about my diabetes?”

1999  “I hate diabetes.”

2000  “Feeling out of control.  Help!”

2001  “The way things are going, I might as well give up.”

2002  “I can’t do college while panicking like this.  I can’t even pick up a pencil.”

2003  “Can I turn my life around?  Is it possible?  I can’t live like this anymore.”

2004  “Ooooh…alcohol…what a nice way to forget my problems!”

2005  “Alcohol is useless.  Trying to do better.  Trying to do better.  Trying to do better.”

2006  “Eat this not that.  Do this not that.  Change is hard.  Super hard.”

2007  “Wow, I’m doing better…Just keep going.”

2008  “A1c is down.  Weight is down.  I can run a 5k every day.  Getting married this year.  Happiness is totally up.  I can’t believe this is my life now.”

2009  “TWINS!  Must. Have. Sleep.”

2010 “We’re not poor, we’re just struggling. (Can I borrow a $5 for groceries?)”

2011 “Hello DOC!”

2012  “I can do this!  Wait a minute…I am doing this.”

Life ebbs and flows.  When you’re on the up, enjoy it and take steps to safeguard your future.  When you’re down, know that you will be back up again.  Just don’t give up hope.  Giving up hope prolongs the process between going from down to up and we don’t want that.  Don’t give up hope.

Wordless Wednesday

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Ok so my version of Wordless Wednesdays isn’t so wordless.  But it’s shorter than the usual post.

I just read an article in last month’s National Geographic about Teenage Brains.  By using modern technology they’ve discovered that the teenage brain is not fully formed and this serves as an explanation to the often bewildering and parent maddening behavior.

What does this have to do with diabetes?  Well, the article states the brain’s development is completed in the mid-20s and the fact that before this the brain is incomplete and this has a direct impact on decision making skills.

How many of us struggled most with our diabetes during our teenage years and early 20s?  I did.  For those of us who grew up with diabetes, I think we owe ourselves forgiveness.  Trying to survive, day to day, with such a complicated and relentless disease without even having the proper mental maturity to do so 100% of the time?  That’s actually amazing.  For those of you with children with diabetes, this article really is a great read.  I definitely needed my parents to help me with my diabetes when I was a teenager and to stay connected and to catch my sneaky ways and notice when I was taking a crazy risk and I don’t think I’m the only one.  (And I was a kid everyone thought was responsible and “together”)

This may not be the most uplifting of news but the article puts a very positive spin on it and helps us appreciate all the wonderful things about young people and gives a few tips on how to help.

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