Tag Archives: low information diet

New Year’s Resolutions for September and October

It’s that time again.  During the last two months my resolution was to get more social.  How did I do?  Ummmm…this was really tough for me.  Here in Virginia (and many other places) we had a killer of a summer.  Getting out with twin babies in 90 degree heat is not easy since they overheat quickly. 

My husband also spent a few weeks commuting an hour to and from work…two less hours each day that we had him around.  I don’t go out without an extra hand since carrying two babies down three flights of stairs is a bit tough to manage. 

So I thought, what can I do to be more social?  I tried reaching out more to the online diabetes community.  This may seem easy but, it really isn’t.  It takes time and patience.  I’ve emailed with a few fellow diabetics and added a few more friends to the facebook account.  I’ve also caught up with a handful of people from high school.  I’m hoping I took a few steps in the right direction.  Part of what makes me hesitant to invite people over are my daughter’s allergies.  It makes me a bit nervous since I have everyone take of their shoes when they come in and wash their hands before touching her.  And I hate to bother people.  (I’m the girl that won’t call you because she doesn’t want to interrupt whatever it is you’re doing).  It’s silly, I know.

Well enough about that.  For September and October my resolution will be to go on a low information diet.  This inspiration came from  The Four Hour Work Week by Tim Ferris. 

Basically, it is about minimizing the time spent absorbing unnecessary information from newspapers, the radio, TV, and internet. 

Honestly, I’m already on a pretty low info diet.  I only watch a little bit of select TV on the computer and don’t have cable.  This means my husband and I plan out a show or two to watch, sit down and watch it and it’s done.  No channel surfing, no wasting time watching stuff we really aren’t enjoying. 

I don’t talk much on the phone and I don’t listen to the radio or read the paper but, I do occasionally waste time on the internet.  I check email too often (and I’ve got 4 different accounts).  I also have “stumbled upon” Stumble Upon.  This is a social media tool where you select your topics of interests and then use the tool bar to click on the word “Stumble”.  This in turn takes you to a random website within the topics you’ve selected.  I can’t describe the joy I get from Stumbling around getting pleasantly surprised by wonderful internet discoveries. 

You might be thinking, why is this such a negative habit?  It isn’t so much negative as it is simply not in line with my goals.  I have plenty of goals throughout the day and not a lot of time to achieve them.  Wasting any time means some of the things I want to accomplish each day do not get accomplished.  So as picky as it sounds I want to streamline my daily activities by being on a low information diet.  The repercussions of not cleaning the bathroom are larger than they seem. Sigh…

What is better for the world?  That I am up to speed on all the recent headlines on CNN or that I write my book about diabetes and give something of value to fellow diabetics out there?  The truth, as Tim Ferris has pointed out in his book, is that we typically aren’t going to do anything about what we hear in the news.  Someone got murdered states away, are you going to go help out the family?  My guess is no.  But, you’ll probably be a great contributor to society if you work on your most important tasks during the day and achieve your ultimate goals.  At least you’ll be more happy having accomplished things and God knows we need more happy people on this earth.

So there is my philosophy about that.  My goal is to work more on cooking for the family (something I’m bad at because I hate how 2 hours of cooking gets gobbled up in 5 minutes) and cleaning the house (sooo necessary right now) and writing my articles and book (one of my top priorities). 

So here we go, let’s see how I do!

Side note:  For those of you just getting in on my resolutions, I have been changing one habit of mine every two months using Leo Babauta’s Six Changes Method.  It works great!  This is the first year I have felt I’m actually sticking with my resolutions AND not feeling overwhelmed by them.  I highly recommend it! 

Remember, we are much more successful when we replace a bad habit with a good one instead of just trying to stop a bad habit without having something to fill the void.