Tag Archives: Type 1 Diabetes

Sunday Diabetes Blog Week 2015 Check this Blogger Out

Click for the Continuing Connections – Sunday 5/17 Link List.
The very first inspiration for Diabetes Blog Week was to help connect our blogging community, and that continues to be the most important reason it’s held every year.  So let’s help foster and continue those connections as we wrap up another Dblog Week.  Share a link to a new blog you’ve found or a new friend you’ve made.  Or pick a random blog off of the Participant’s List, check it out and share it with us.  Let’s take some time today to make new friends.

 

 

I discovered a blogger that has a sense of humor, a heavy technical slant, has had type 1 since age 4 so I think about 44 years now.  He writes in German and English and shared really interesting posts this week.  I think I’ll be reading more.  Check out Thomas here at: http://thomas-diabetes-blog.com/blog/

Wednesday 2015 Diabetes Blog Week What I Need to Clean Out

Click for the Clean it Out – Wednesday 5/13 Link List.
Yesterday we kept stuff in, so today let’s clear stuff out.  What is in your diabetic closet that needs to be cleaned out?  This can be an actual physical belonging, or it can be something you’re mentally or emotionally hanging on to.  Why are you keeping it and why do you need to get rid of it?  (Thank you Rick of RA Diabetes for this topic suggestion.)

 

I am a sentimental fool.  Let me tell you about the lancet device I use.  Well, first let me explain that last year I was using a multi clix device and I really loved it (ooh and I know I want to try the fast clix!)  But then my dog chewed it up and I went back to my original 1994 (don’t know what brand, it has long rubbed off) lancet device.  It’s the one I’ve mostly used throughout the years.  I’ve tried new ones, agreed the new ones are better, and then my weirdo self went back to the original.

Why?  I think using this clunky, loud, and more painful device makes me feel like I haven’t had diabetes for 20 years.  There is a sense that 20 years hasn’t actually gone by.  It makes me feel younger because I was 11 when I started using it.  It makes me feel like there is some consistency to my diabetes even though I’ve been on a roller coaster in terms of how I manage my diabetes and even though my body has certainly been affected by diabetes.  People who are now long gone have laid eyes on this device, probably somewhat associating it with me.  The sound is familiar-it makes a horribly loud and clunky (not clicky) noise.  I’m appreciative of how this device hasn’t broken in 20 years despite all the times I’ve dropped it.  See?  I’ve got my silly reasons.

I’m hoping to tear away again and use a highly superior lancet device.  In the meantime I will stick with this one out of some strange sense of comfort and practicality  (because I rarely change the needle, I still have plenty of them for this device).  I just need to let go.  Accept some final things.  Like, that I’ve had diabetes a hella long time.  And that’s ok.  Because I’m ok.

Diabetes Blog Week 2013 Day 1

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It’s:

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Often our health care team only sees us for about 15 minutes several times a year, and they might not have a sense of what our lives are really like. Today, let’s pretend our medical team is reading our blogs. What do you wish they could see about your and/or your loved one’s daily life with diabetes? On the other hand, what do you hope they don’t see?  (Thanks to Melissa Lee of Sweetly Voiced for this topic suggestion.)

 

Hmm…  Ok.  I want my medical team to know that I know that they don’t know as much as they think they know about my diabetes.  I do have to say however, my endo is extremely insightful about my type 1 diabetes.  He doesn’t assume things and he seems very aware of the challenges involved in managing type 1 diabetes and for that I’m grateful.  As for the rest of the team:  Just know that you don’t know much.  That would really help me out.  Really.

Oh and I’ll be happy to answer any questions you have.

Things to Remember If You Take Insulin

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I have been on shot therapy since 2007.  Before that I used a pump but we didn’t get along because I was out of control with my diabetes at the time.  I do well with shots so I stick with them for now.  These tips apply with taking insulin by shots or a pump.

There are a few things I have to constantly remind myself of when taking insulin.  Things that make everything go more smoothly.

So I’m going to share 5 Things to Remember if You Take Insulin:

1.  Read the pamphlet of information about your fast acting insulin or ask your doctor to find out how many minutes it takes your fast acting to start working.

Mine takes about 15 minutes.  So test well before eating a meal and then give your insulin some time to start working.  If my sugar is 100 before a meal, I give it about 10 minutes to start working, less if my meal has a lot of fat or slow moving carbs like legumes.  If my sugar is 150, I wait about 25 minutes before eating.  This isn’t a hard rule, and I don’t recommend you do exactly what I do.  I recommend that you figure out how long it takes your insulin to start working and then give it some time before digging into your meal.  Ideally, when the carbs in our meal start raising our blood sugar, our insulin will be there to cancel it out.  If you don’t do this, chances are you will start causing your sugar to climb and then the insulin will have a late start and have a harder time pushing down your higher blood sugar.  End result?  Post meal blood sugar levels that leave you assuming your insulin dosage for your meal wasn’t accurate.  But, maybe it was accurate.  Maybe you just didn’t time things right.

2.  Every time you give insulin a certain amount isn’t going to be properly absorbed by the body.  And that certain amount is random and unpredictable.  This means that if you want more consistency with blood sugars, being careful with carbohydrates, particularly those in starchy processed foods is your best bet.  I’m not saying eat low carb, just saying that it’s impossible to always give the perfect amount of insulin.  Knowing this helps me plan meals and check any extra guilt and frustration at the door.

3.  If you take a long acting insulin, find out how many hours it lasts.  You may be surprised to find that a 24 hour insulin isn’t exactly 24 hours but a little less than that.  Knowing this, you can predict when your blood sugars may begin to rise and counter that with a little exercise or fast acting insulin.

4.  Find out how long your insulin lasts once opened and then get rid of it when that time comes.  Otherwise you shouldn’t be surprised when blood sugars seem inexplicably off.  I sometimes use my insulin a little longer than I should to save money.  And I pay the price.  But I do so knowingly and I share this so that no one pays the price out of just not being aware.  So arm yourself with knowledge and then try to make a wiser choice than me. Winking smile

5.  Last but not least, when it seems your insulin just isn’t working, don’t go more than a week without trying to figure out what’s going on.  Try changing the bottle.  Check and see if you have any infections or chronic pain happening.  Make sure you’re not allergic to your insulin and report any strange aftermath on your body where you gave insulin.  If you’ve ruled that out, check your body for any dark brown markings that often indicate insulin resistance.  Ask your doctor about them if you have them.

Me?  I shun all processed foods and make sure I’m eating well and getting exercise.  Usually reducing my carbs a little and doing exercise at least 3 times a week helps greatly to get my insulin working well again.  Maybe I’m susceptible to this because I have a lot of type 2 diabetes in the family but either way, I try not to go long with insulin that doesn’t seem to be working well.  For me it’s usually insulin resistance and it’s a sign I need to tweak my lifestyle a bit.  I’ve even gone “raw” for a week or two to get back on track.  The longer you deal with high blood sugars, the worse you’ll feel and risk down spiraling somewhere hard to climb out of so get to the bottom of consistent and inexplicable highs ASAP so you can feel better sooner rather than later.  Too busy in your life to do this?  Just remember, diabetes comes first because it damages every cell in the body.  And before you let that get you down, just think, you and I have some measure of control over our diabetes right?  Let’s take advantage of that!

 

How the DOC Helped Me Check Again

Part of a diabetes art showing by Ana Morales

 

There have been times when I’ve slacked when it comes to how often I check my blood sugars.  Sometimes I get down to 4 times a day and I know that isn’t personally enough-not for my aggressive control of blood sugars.  But, I rarely keep that up for long because being connected to the DOC, or Diabetes Online Community, means constant reminders of how important checking blood sugars is along with encouragement and people to really relate to.

In January I ran out of test strips because I had given half of my last shipment to my brother, who was just recently diagnosed with type 1 and then I ran out of money.  I had to put money into paying rent and bills and focused on just getting by while not feeling pity for myself but instead, feeling happy and grateful that I normally am able to afford all that I need for my diabetes.

I made a comment on Facebook about having run out of strips and was shocked by how many fellow people with diabetes suddenly told me they would send me some extras they had.  Several people knew I didn’t have a certain kind of meter and ended up sending me strips and the meter that corresponded.

It has been so heartwarming.  Strips are a precious commodity for us people with diabetes-and they cost a lot  So to me these acts of kindness are HUGE!

I was getting by decently by eating low carb, skipping meals, and trying to constantly guess my blood sugars.  Thanks to certain members of the DOC, I was able to stop the stressful madness and check again.

I can’t thank you enough,.  Thank you, thank you, thank you.

I accepted the help on the condition that if these people ever needed anything they’d let me know.  I hope they know I mean that ;)

Just another reason why being part of the DOC is awesome.

Summertime River Adventures

Ana and I (Sysy) have been without power since the mad derecho storm surprised us Friday evening.  Don’t worry, our other sister Sara is keeping us and our insulin at her home.  Anyway, Ana and I are at the library trying to stay cool and…letting the show continue.  Here is a blog Ana wrote from her river adventure last week.  (She was unaware the real summertime adventure was yet to come!) *****

 

"You can't tell but my blood sugar is high"

I know a lot of outdoorsy people, and I can’t say I’m one of them. I mean, I like being outside, but if you asked me to go camping I would be (extremely) reluctant. I don’t blame my diabetes for that—at least not entirely. I try to not let it be reason for not doing something that I actually want to do (like tubing down a river!), which is why I just try to figure out what I need to do and bring with me on outdoor adventures so that I’m prepared for low or high blood sugar levels. And yeah, it’s a little inconvenient to have to carry extra things and worry about the temperature, but it’s way better than the alternative (the alternative being either doing something less exciting or ending up in a hospital…).

So yes, as you can see, I went tubing down a river for the first time this summer! I went with my boyfriend and several friends to the New River Junction in Blacksburg, VA. There were 13 of us total—11 on tubes and 2 in open kayaks. My boyfriend was in one of the kayaks and he had a cooler with my insulin, meter, drinks, and snacks tied to the back of it. I wore water shoes to protect my feet since the whole bottom of the river was just rocks.

Only one person carried their phone with them, so I frequently asked what time it was. We skipped lunch and got in the water at around 1pm, so I told my boyfriend I had to give my Lantus injection in 3 hours. We spent about 2 hours tied together in our tubes just floating down the river—occasionally hitting our rear ends on rocks, but other than that it was pretty peaceful We also went down a small section of rapids, which was probably my favorite part (and I was almost too scared to do it!).

They had buses that would drive you back up to where you get in, so we got on the bus while the 2 kayakers paddled back to meet us. When we got back to the other end, I asked what time it was—it was 3:40. Then I looked for my boyfriend who had my insulin and I could hardly see him because he was so far away. I panicked a little and told the others that I needed my insulin so we got back in the water and they yelled a few times, “Ramonnn!! Ana needs her insulinnn!!” Fortunately he heard so he paddled over to us pretty quickly. Still on my float, I gave my injection, checked my blood sugar, and gave an injection of Novolog because I was really high. I had hardly eaten all day, so I’m guessing the high blood sugar level was a result of the heat, my stress, and also the lack of insulin earlier (I gave less in case I had to swim). Once we got out of the river again, I drank lots of water. It took a while for my blood sugar to come down, so I didn’t eat much for dinner.

In the end, I realized I could have been a bit more prepared, but I didn’t know what to expect so it was hard to plan. Next time I’ll check more frequently and maybe invest in a waterproof watch? I’ll also keep a bottle of water with me (my float has cupholders!). Anyway, from a not-so-outdoorsy person to you, don’t let diabetes keep you from doing what you want! Just do your best in preparing for any adventure you may have (not just outdoors) by anticipating possible situations. Have a wonderful adventure-filled summer!

 

How I Use MDI

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A lot of people have asked me questions about how I manage my type 1 diabetes via multiple daily injections so that’s what this post is about.

Firstly, I want to say that this is what I do and what works for me and before you try to change anything to your diabetes management, you want to talk to your doctor.  Insulin dosages vary person to person depending on their weight, activity level, stress level, diet, insulin resistance, medications, etc.

I use Lantus insulin as my long acting “basal” insulin and Humalog insulin as my fast acting “bolus” insulin.

My Lantus routine

Every night around 10pm I give an injection of Lantus.  Based on my weight which hovers between 130-140 pounds, I am to give about 20 units per day.  This does work for me.  However, I try to exercise each day and eat a diet that is void of processed foods and low in glycemic load.  These two factors cause my insulin needs to decrease.  If I’m exercising and eating the way I try to, I use about 12 units of Lantus.  If I don’t do one of these, I will need about 15-16 units of Lantus.

I just want to note that when I removed wheat out of my diet, I lowered my Lantus by about 5 units, daily.  Kind of amazing.

Anyway, Lantus is advertised as a 24 hour insulin you take once a day.  If you open up the folded pamphlet that comes with Lantus and read it, you’ll discover Lantus lasts closer to around 20-21 hours.  So being aware of this, each day around dinner time, I give a extra unit or two of insulin in order to combat the dying out of Lantus in my system.  Or I do a really short workout and that takes care of things, too.

How do I deal with dawn phenomenon?

Well, I had a hard time with it when I gave my Lantus in the mornings because it would run out just before I woke up and cause me to wake up pretty high unless I slept around 75-80 (in that case dawn phenomenon didn’t do anything to me).  So that’s why I give Lantus at night.  Each morning, I notice that if I wake up at 7:30am or before 7:30am, I don’t deal with the dawn phenomenon.  If I sleep past that time, I will start to go up pretty quickly.  I don’t know why my dawn phenomenon seems to kick in so late, but it does.  By experimenting with testing at different times in the morning before you give insulin or eat, you can pinpoint the general time your body starts pushing your blood sugars up each morning.  I do find that if I sleep under 100, dawn phenomenon doesn’t do anything.  But sometimes I don’t feel safe sleeping at that blood sugar level, because perhaps I did more exercise than usual or something and in those cases I’ll try to sleep between 110-140.  Being in that range in the early morning typically causes a dawn phenomenon spike for me so I try to get up at the same time each day and give insulin and eat first thing.

My Humalog routine

I use Humalog as needed and before meals.  I just count carbs and take note of my insulin/carb ratio which is about 1:15.  Most of my meals let me give below 2-3 units of insulin so I don’t usually have to worry about really high or low post meal blood sugar swings.  I do notice that sometimes I’m really stressed and sometimes forget to drink water.  As a result my blood sugar climbs considerably.  I give an extra amount of insulin with meals to combat this.  If the stress is a bit chronic (long term) I’ll up my Lantus instead of my Humalog-which I reserve for very temporary situations.

About injecting

I inject in public as needed.  I inject in my abdomen, hips, arms, and above my breasts (click here for a video of that).  I reserve my hips and arms for times my blood sugar is kind of low (around 75) and my abdomen and the fatty tissue above my breasts for the times I’m ready to eat or over 120 because those areas tend to yield faster results with the insulin.  I rotate a lot more than I used to because it helps avoid the buildup of scar tissue-which absolutely affects insulin absorption and makes it more random.  After giving an insulin shot, I put my fingers over the area and press gently for a few seconds.  This is supposed to help the insulin get absorbed.  I don’t use insulin pens because sometimes I am not sure how much insulin I got or sometimes insulin leaks from the site.  I like the small child-sized syringes by BD that hold up to 30 units of insulin and have a very short and fine needle.  If you are not thin or average weight, you’ll want a longer needle in order to ensure the insulin gets properly absorbed.

Carrying and caring for insulin

I carry a case with my meter and Humalog insulin at all times.  I keep Lantus in the fridge in the butter compartment.  I don’t keep Humalog anywhere near my Lantus because I don’t want to risk giving a huge amount Humalog when I intended to give Lantus.  I’ve done that twice and it resulted in me seeing the paramedics on both occasions.  After 30 days I dispose of Lantus and Humalog (even though I have plenty left).  I never refrigerate my Humalog because it lasts 30 days without refrigeration and it is supposed to be disposed of after 30 days anyway.

Does it work for me?

So that’s how I do it.  I have managed to use the method described above for 5 years now and keep my A1c below 6% the entire time.  Shots work if you understand some insider info and consider appropriate timing and carb counting.  I had to learn a lot of this the hard way or through my doctors.  If any of this info is news to you, talk to your doctor about it.  Make sure you understand the ins and outs of the insulin you use.  It totally affects diabetes management.

Please read this part again:

Please remember that changes to your diabetes management should be done carefully and *technically* with the approval and guidance of a physician.  Don’t get hurt and then blame me Winking smile

XOXO

Don’t Settle When It Comes to Health

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I know it’s comforting to settle for the current level of health we have, especially when faced with the prospect of making seemingly impossible lifestyle changes.  Yet, I find that at the end of the day, much of our frustrations and grief, directly or indirectly, come from our less than stellar health.

Most days I feel like I can say I’m “pretty healthy”.  There are days though, when I’m more honest with myself, and picky, too.  On these days I realize I have a long way to go to reach the level of health I long for.  When almost everyone we know struggles with some fatigue, extra weight, acne or other skin issues, mental illness, and other nagging health problems, it’s no wonder so many of us tend to feel that it’s just all an unavoidable part of being human.

Many of us have forgotten that it’s possible to feel and look much better than we do.  I used to think that all teenagers got acne.  Then I learned my parents never got acne and their peers rarely did, either.  I didn’t until I was 23 and my horrible diet finally caught up with me.  I used to think that everyone got indigestion after many meals.  Nope.  Some people rarely get indigestion.  Or headaches, stiff joints, mood swings, irritability, hot flashes during menopause.  Some people don’t even have to brush their teeth to avoid cavities, bad breathe, and gum disease.  Can you imagine?  But these select people eat very differently from us.  And in most cases, they do it because they have no other choice.

While these people have to work hard to find and prepare the food they eat, we have to work hard not to eat.  If the only choices we had were vegetables and fish for dinner, we’d just eat it and reap the health benefits.  You and I have a unique situation that is becoming the norm across the globe.  We have thousands of foods and “foods” to select from and then hundreds of dietary theories from which we can subscribe and it’s all very daunting.

Why is there a type 2 diabetes epidemic? I hear a lot of talk that it’s our genes that are somehow making us more and more susceptible coupled with our changing lifestyle habits and environment. And that’s technically true, but do we ever think about what changes our genes in the first place? According to what I’ve learned, a big part of the reason is the food we eat and the food we don’t eat or rather the food our ancestors ate and didn’t eat. With each new generation, eating habits in recent years have included more genetically modified foods and chemicals and when we have children, we aren’t building a person as well as we could because our diet doesn’t provide us the tools with which to properly do this. Teeth aren’t as straight, facial features aren’t as symmetrical, brain cavities aren’t as roomy (affecting hormone production), and so on.  Nutrients are needed to make a human being and bring them healthy into this world. In a nutrient starved world, we’re consistently churning out more and more children who are challenged with early health issues like the predisposition to allergies, obesity, diabetes, cancer, and other chronic diseases.

The good news is that even if we suffered the effects of malnourished ancestors, (remember you can be overweight and malnourished) we can still turn things around for future generations. We can change our eating habits and create healthier children, who will in turn be poised to create healthier children themselves.

We can also change our habits and gain from doing so right now.  Genes get activated much like an on/off switch with what we eat and how we live.  If we carry a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, a certain lifestyle has the potential to keep the switch on off and help us avoid developing type 2 diabetes.  This is not an easy task in this modern world of ours but I think it’s empowering to know what’s possible and to strive towards the best outcome for all of us.  I understand we can’t do this overnight.  Personally, I’ve dedicated a lot of time and energy to trying to begin to change my lifestyle habits.  I can attest to the fact that it takes time and a lot of effort.  But, I do think it’s worth it and doable.

Health isn’t just about comfort and looks.  It’s about humanity, economic stability, peace, creativity, and growth in a society.

There is no blame game here.  None of us is perfect.  We are all allowed our weaknesses.  It’s about taking responsibility for our bodies and choosing to pay attention and learn about what to do to stay well and improve health.  Those of us with extra time or ability to do so can advocate for those who can’t get access to healthy foods and information.  Policies from government need to reinforce healthy lifestyle habits because even the most determined and self willed individual is up against huge obstacles when it comes to a healthy diet and lifestyle and where does that leave the rest of us?

I don’t want to settle for so-so health, when I could have awesome health.  I’m worth awesome health.  And definitely, so are you…and your children, and grandchildren, too.

The 5 Stages of Grief Apply to Diabetes

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You know how when someone dies, a loved one often goes through stages of grief which are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally, acceptance?

I think that when someone gets a diabetes diagnosis, they go through those same phases.  No one has died in this case but something has-life as we know it.  Our lives matter a lot to us, there is no denying that.  So when a doctor informs us that we have a disease that will last the rest of our lifetime, requires constant monitoring and care, changes to habits and routines we may have in place, and causes all sorts potential health problems that bring about inconvenience and pain…well, it’s not unlike experiencing the death of a loved one.

I’m not saying it’s as painful as experiencing the death of a loved one.  I’m just saying the stages of grief are the same.  For example, when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 11, my first inclination was to be like…”noo……really?”  I quickly got angry and though I didn’t show it, I know it because my diary at the time has a page on it where I wrote, “Damn diabetes, I hate you!”  The letters are made out in straight lines and you can tell I pressed down really hard, accentuating each stroke with multiple slashes from my ball point pen.  Next came bargaining.  I grew up in a place where almost everyone is religious and so friends would take me to their churches in hopes that their pastor could “cure me”.  I went along because deep down I wished someone could.  I also didn’t even think a single cuss word between the ages of 12 and 14 in an effort to be “good” enough for God to cure.

Then came depression.  This stage lasted a long, long time.  Many years in fact.  There are catalysts that move us out from the first few stages of grief.  We can’t physically handle staying in shock and in denial for too long.  We only have so much adrenaline and reality is a very persistent nag.  Anger usually leads to self-destruction and it wears us out until we realize it doesn’t improve anything.  It doesn’t take long to figure out that bargaining isn’t going to cure us.  But depression is a disease.  It eats at our brains and takes away our strength every day.  Depression literally changes the chemicals in our brains.  So people often hang out at this stage for a long time.  I was no different.

Acceptance.  It’s so empowering, so forgiving.  When we reach this stage a sense of peace comes over us.  The thick cloud of our diagnosis lifts and we are able to hope, be inspired, and dream about our future.  Life isn’t a drag anymore and our diagnosis might actually do the unexpected-bear gifts.  We can move forward.  We see potential and possibilities.  We know we are going to be ok.

If you’re a diabetic and haven’t reached the final stage of acceptance, please know that you can.  You just have to give yourself time to heal and time to learn about what your diabetes management requires.  Nothing is wrong with you for grieving the loss of the life you once knew.  And you have permission to move ahead when you’re ready.  Get help for the tough days and look forward to the better ones.

They are coming.

Updates and Random Thoughts

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Isn’t that the cutest little turtle?

 

Note to Self About Grocery Shopping

Sysy, for the love of God, test before doing groceries.  The other day,  I scratched my head in wonder as I watched the check out lady scan my glucose tablets, ice cream, chocolate, and cookies.  How’d all that sugar jump into my cart?  Then I got in the car and tested 52.  Ahh…survival instincts.

Update on Ana’s Diabetes Art Project

We asked for used strip donations the other day so Ana could put them together into a piece of art that would simultaneously work as a strong piece of diabetes advocacy. But oops, we didn’t realize that used strips are hazardous waste material. It’s unlikely, but still possible, that strips can transmit diseases and such. I forgot because strips are such a constant and casual part of life. We see them all over the place and just pick them up and toss them in the trash. Really, we’re expected to carefully dispose of them in tightly sealed containers along with sharps. I don’t carefully dispose of sharps, either. Oops. Do you?

Anyway, don’t send donations for strips! Those of you who offered to do it-THANK YOU so much for your support, it means SO much that you were willing to help out!  Ana will find another way to create a work of diabetes art. If you have any ideas, she’d love to hear them. I’m excited to see what she comes up with and I know that no matter what she does, it will still be awesome. Now whatever she uses will just be more sanitary to work with. Hehe…

Oh and those of you who offered advice on this project, legal information, and who offered to send strips are all entered in a drawing to win a prize.  We really appreciate all the support.  Stay tuned for that!

It’s Strip Rationing Time

My mail order pharmacy is taking FOREVER to get my strips to me ( like weeks upon weeks) so I’ve been forced to ration strips for 2 weeks. I stopped my initial reaction precisely at “grrrggghhh” and thought about how right now, some kid, somewhere is walking several miles on bare feet to a tiny clinic where they will check their blood sugar and administer one insulin shot for the entire day. It’s grossly insufficient isn’t it?

I like to test around 8 times a day. I have realized that with a lot of discipline, I can get very similar results and test only 4 times a day. And instead of whining about how it isn’t fair, I’m thinking that I’m really lucky to have these 4 tests each day. I try to use them wisely and all my other actions throughout the day are well thought out and planned for blood sugar stability. And when thinking about what others have to go through to barely survive, really, it’s just an honor to attempt to ration my strips in the most graceful way possible (and with the least amount of cursing).

Then when my strips come in I’ll be even more grateful for the flexibility and freedom they provide me.

Oh my gosh, they just arrived to my door!  YES!  I feel like I just won a prize.  It’s crazy how important these little strips are to us, isn’t it?

New Ads

On the right hand column of this blog you will notice a new ad and another one coming soon.  I’m getting a small fee for posting these which I am reinvesting back into the site to make sure it’s fast enough and not a burden to you all and to make sure I can afford to keep the site alive.  I hope the ads aren’t a bother.  I thank you for your readership and fabulous support.

Have a great Wednesday!

XOXO,

Sysy

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