Tag Archives: type 2 diabetes

Sunday Diabetes Blog Week 2015 Check this Blogger Out

Click for the Continuing Connections – Sunday 5/17 Link List.
The very first inspiration for Diabetes Blog Week was to help connect our blogging community, and that continues to be the most important reason it’s held every year.  So let’s help foster and continue those connections as we wrap up another Dblog Week.  Share a link to a new blog you’ve found or a new friend you’ve made.  Or pick a random blog off of the Participant’s List, check it out and share it with us.  Let’s take some time today to make new friends.

 

 

I discovered a blogger that has a sense of humor, a heavy technical slant, has had type 1 since age 4 so I think about 44 years now.  He writes in German and English and shared really interesting posts this week.  I think I’ll be reading more.  Check out Thomas here at: http://thomas-diabetes-blog.com/blog/

Don’t Settle When It Comes to Health

380498_257601800963624_254597271264077_771624_1837414961_n

I know it’s comforting to settle for the current level of health we have, especially when faced with the prospect of making seemingly impossible lifestyle changes.  Yet, I find that at the end of the day, much of our frustrations and grief, directly or indirectly, come from our less than stellar health.

Most days I feel like I can say I’m “pretty healthy”.  There are days though, when I’m more honest with myself, and picky, too.  On these days I realize I have a long way to go to reach the level of health I long for.  When almost everyone we know struggles with some fatigue, extra weight, acne or other skin issues, mental illness, and other nagging health problems, it’s no wonder so many of us tend to feel that it’s just all an unavoidable part of being human.

Many of us have forgotten that it’s possible to feel and look much better than we do.  I used to think that all teenagers got acne.  Then I learned my parents never got acne and their peers rarely did, either.  I didn’t until I was 23 and my horrible diet finally caught up with me.  I used to think that everyone got indigestion after many meals.  Nope.  Some people rarely get indigestion.  Or headaches, stiff joints, mood swings, irritability, hot flashes during menopause.  Some people don’t even have to brush their teeth to avoid cavities, bad breathe, and gum disease.  Can you imagine?  But these select people eat very differently from us.  And in most cases, they do it because they have no other choice.

While these people have to work hard to find and prepare the food they eat, we have to work hard not to eat.  If the only choices we had were vegetables and fish for dinner, we’d just eat it and reap the health benefits.  You and I have a unique situation that is becoming the norm across the globe.  We have thousands of foods and “foods” to select from and then hundreds of dietary theories from which we can subscribe and it’s all very daunting.

Why is there a type 2 diabetes epidemic? I hear a lot of talk that it’s our genes that are somehow making us more and more susceptible coupled with our changing lifestyle habits and environment. And that’s technically true, but do we ever think about what changes our genes in the first place? According to what I’ve learned, a big part of the reason is the food we eat and the food we don’t eat or rather the food our ancestors ate and didn’t eat. With each new generation, eating habits in recent years have included more genetically modified foods and chemicals and when we have children, we aren’t building a person as well as we could because our diet doesn’t provide us the tools with which to properly do this. Teeth aren’t as straight, facial features aren’t as symmetrical, brain cavities aren’t as roomy (affecting hormone production), and so on.  Nutrients are needed to make a human being and bring them healthy into this world. In a nutrient starved world, we’re consistently churning out more and more children who are challenged with early health issues like the predisposition to allergies, obesity, diabetes, cancer, and other chronic diseases.

The good news is that even if we suffered the effects of malnourished ancestors, (remember you can be overweight and malnourished) we can still turn things around for future generations. We can change our eating habits and create healthier children, who will in turn be poised to create healthier children themselves.

We can also change our habits and gain from doing so right now.  Genes get activated much like an on/off switch with what we eat and how we live.  If we carry a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, a certain lifestyle has the potential to keep the switch on off and help us avoid developing type 2 diabetes.  This is not an easy task in this modern world of ours but I think it’s empowering to know what’s possible and to strive towards the best outcome for all of us.  I understand we can’t do this overnight.  Personally, I’ve dedicated a lot of time and energy to trying to begin to change my lifestyle habits.  I can attest to the fact that it takes time and a lot of effort.  But, I do think it’s worth it and doable.

Health isn’t just about comfort and looks.  It’s about humanity, economic stability, peace, creativity, and growth in a society.

There is no blame game here.  None of us is perfect.  We are all allowed our weaknesses.  It’s about taking responsibility for our bodies and choosing to pay attention and learn about what to do to stay well and improve health.  Those of us with extra time or ability to do so can advocate for those who can’t get access to healthy foods and information.  Policies from government need to reinforce healthy lifestyle habits because even the most determined and self willed individual is up against huge obstacles when it comes to a healthy diet and lifestyle and where does that leave the rest of us?

I don’t want to settle for so-so health, when I could have awesome health.  I’m worth awesome health.  And definitely, so are you…and your children, and grandchildren, too.

Paula Deen and Her Type 2 Diabetes

Paula-Deen (1)

Those are some white teeth ya’ll…:)

I do see how some of her comments don’t help us diabetic people out.  She just said that diabetes is “not a life sentence”.  This doesn’t bother me much because I take it into context and I know she is talking about her type 2 diabetes.  However, I do understand that the majority of the world out there doesn’t know that type 1 and 2 are different diseases (though we haven’t actually figured those details out for 100% certain, yet).  Anyway, the point is that I completely understand the frustration to those with diabetes who say, “Wait just one minute!  Diabetes IS life threatening for me and can definitely be for other people with diabetes!”  I get it.  I don’t however, want to punch the lady in the face for not being specific enough when I know she was just trying to spread a little hope to others.  Even if that hope came across a bit rehearsed.  After all, she can most likely pay for any operation she ever needs of pocket and the rest of us, cannot.

I see the backlash on Paula Deen as a way of our collective society screaming out  and saying “I don’t eat enough healthy food and exercise enough and as a result I am not as healthy as I could be and this affects everything in my life”.  We’re speaking through Paula in light of her type 2 diabetes.  I honestly believe that.  We relate to her.  We enjoyed our processed food and then realized the hard way that those delicious foods are hurting us more than they are pleasing us.  Maybe some of us have gained a lot of weight, maybe some developed a thyroid problem, while others might have developed type 2 diabetes thanks to the last kicker of their predisposed genes.  But all of us who have ate a more or less standard American diet HAVE felt the negative consequences of it in some way, shape, or form.  Whether we know it or not.  You see, that food isn’t meant to be abused and since we’re human, and since that food is cheap and convenient and addicting, the easiest thing in the world is to abuse it.  Paula Deen is just one of us.

Those of us who can afford to buy healthy whole foods vote every time we shop.  If we buy cookies and chips every time we go to the store then we have to know that we are part of the ongoing business for these companies who don’t make healthy food.  We help keep them alive.  Does that mean we should be judged for wanting some treats throughout the week?  As a whole I tend to think we have as much power as someone as famous as Paula Deen.  It’s way more complicated than that though isn’t it?  And I assume it’s more complicated for her than we realize, too.

I’ve heard a few people say that they don’t care what Paula does or doesn’t do because it’s none of our business  I believe people’s actions does affect us all.  So I absolutely do care if you are drinking and then driving.  I care if you are making babies over and over again and dropping them all off at an orphanage.  I care if you are dealing with type 2 diabetes.  I care that you have depression.  It affects you if I have type 1 diabetes and if I use up all my FMLA at work and if I smoke and if I neglect my kids and if I find a cure for diabetes (Ah, we’d all like that one wouldn’t we!).  But it’s not a “just don’t hurt me or mine” kind of caring.  It’s a caring that wants good for all.  I don’t want you to drink and drive because you might hurt someone I love or you might hurt some other innocent soul or…you might hurt yourself.  It all matters.

I believe in something between judging and “live and let live” and it’s caring.

That’s how I feel about Paula Deen.  I respect that she has fans and that those fans cook what she teaches them to cook.  I respect that they look up to her as a jolly country hostess who hugs her southern roots, butter, flour, sugar, and sparkling white teeth and blue eyes, and runs with them all the way to the bank.  But, I also know that if she has type 2 diabetes, she suffers and so do her family and friends.  She is a famous type 2 diabetic that others are going to look to as an example.  It’s possible that her diet contributed very much to her diagnosis.  Let’s not pretend that isn’t possible.  Genes aren’t entirely responsible for type 2 diabetes since in most cases obesity is a factor (another issue we shouldn’t judge, by the way).  That doesn’t mean she doesn’t deserve compassion and that doesn’t mean we let her completely off the hook.  But while her diagnosis is her business, her having diabetes is…in an indirect way, our business.  When our society suffers a lot of health problems, we all suffer.  The solution isn’t pointing fingers though, it’s just caring.  After all, the most charming and successful kind of family I’ve ever known is the non-judging, forgiving, communicative, confronting, nosy one.  If we act that way more often as a people, as a society, wonderful changes will come our way.

I think we can say that we want her to be straightforward and sincere and responsible with her position as a famous person with type 2 diabetes and the implications of that.  I think most people rise up to the occasion when we kindly demand that.  Especially if we expect them to with open arms.

As a fellow southern gal, I have a feeling Paula Deen will help us out if we expect her to.  Call me naïve.  The ongoing insults will only make her hide in a closet.  A closet that’s probably as big as a mansion, but still.  We can call her out but do so respectfully. We can ask her questions and persist to get them answered.  If I were her and I read all what is being said online, I’d stick my head in an apple pie for all eternity.  We don’t want that.  We want her on our side.  We gotta stick together, folks.  Diabetes or no diabetes, we’re all in this together.

The Accidental Diabetes Social Experiment

389412_257601707630300_254597271264077_771618_304513589_n

Many of us with diabetes try to make a point to others that the social ramifications of living with diabetes are issues in need of attention.  Yesterday, I was thinking about how true this is while travelling back in my mind over the last few years.

Let me explain.

Three years ago I was two months pregnant with twins and starting to deal with major nausea that lasted for 3 months.  It’s hard to go out and socialize when a twin pregnancy causes you to throw up and fight a blood sugar of 30 or 40 every other night.  Then my belly size became an issue along with dislocated vertebrae.  It was hard to walk or stand or sit comfortably.  Worry also plagued me and by the time my kids arrived, I had really lost contact with the outside world.

It’s ok you know, I don’t really regret it.  I was super focused on the tasks at hand:  Choose amongst a boy and a girl list of baby names, keep blood sugars near normal at all times, eat healthy, buy two of everything, stay calm, meditate, pray, wish on every star.

While I don’t regret it because my kids came out great, the reality is that I was living an experiment in isolation.  This obviously continued through one of the hardest times of my life where I was so busy and so weighed down with post partum depression and therefore didn’t see people except once a week at the grocery store.  You should have seen the look on people’s faces as they stood horrified as I chatted them up in the check out line as if we were long lost best friends.  People wondered why I didn’t just have people over to the house.  This was difficult because during the first 4 months after giving birth, I was pumping breast milk round the clock and dealing with painful mastitis and basically wandered around like a topless zombie.  I didn’t want to scar anyone for life, you know?  After that, I was dealing with such a severe exhaustion and crippling carpel tunnel and tendonitis that I couldn’t fathom having anyone except my family, see me in a such a pitiful state.  The last time people saw me I was looking my best at my wedding and honeymoon and to show my new, contorted self was seemingly unbearable.  Looking back, I know that worrying about this was silly and superficial but in the moment, I was suffering and stuck in a fog of sorts.

The socializing has gradually increased as managing two of the same age has become easier and now it’s left me to reflect.

This experience made me feel that managing diabetes was easier.  How?  Don’t we all do better with support?  I had plenty of support I think.  My husband Alex, my parents and siblings.  I even have a type 1 support in my family-my sister Ana.

But here is what I touched on when I reminisced:

-When I tested my sugar in the middle of an important office meeting, the thought would run through my mind, “Are they wondering if I can keep up with the demands of this job?”

-When I drank juice in the middle of class in college, people who had seen me test and give insulin would often exclaim, “OMG are you ok?”

-While eating out at a restaurant, I’d occasionally get strange looks from nearby eaters while I injected my insulin discretely at the table.

-In the middle of fun dancing at a club, I’d think, “I don’t want to put my fun on hold and test…should I test?  How’s my sugar?” sometimes resulting in high blood sugars afterwards and a good self-scolding.

.And so many more…

So while pregnant and spending all my time at home, my parent’s house, and the doctor’s office I realized I could relax more.  I kind of welcomed the break to do all of my diabetes things in private or amongst those who were used to it all.  I didn’t know I had been a little exhausted of feeling self-conscious all these years.  But I was.

I was tired of trying to smile at people when testing my sugar so that they wouldn’t give me the pitiful “awww” look.  I was tired of telling my concerned soccer coach that I needed “a minute” to get my blood sugar up.  I was tired of eating candy in class and wondering if people would think that my weekly candy or glucose tablets were the reason I was a little overweight.  I was tired of volunteering for every teacher who asked for help to prove to everyone that I was capable.  I was tired of being out in a group of people and being a verbal ninja trying to explain why it really was ok that I was eating a cookie.  I was tired of worrying that someone would see signs of my diabetes and suddenly change their opinion of me.

These last 3 years, I have rested.  I feel recouped and re-energized.  I have mostly healed the young child and teenager with diabetes who suffered more psychologically than physically.  I am more mature and have more willingness to advocate for those with my condition than I did as a child, teenager, and younger adult.  I know how to advocate for myself, too.  I am ready to get back out there and mingle again.

I’m a little scared because it’s been a while and diabetes and isolation makes the shy person a little more shy.  But, you know what?  I try to remember there are millions of us out there.  Millions of shy people and millions of people with diabetes.

Most likely, the person taking extra notice of me and my huge purse, medical alert bracelet, and speckled fingers is just curious or possibly thinking, “Oh wow, she has it, too”.

Wednesday Revisit: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Diabetics

Wedinfall

Wednesday Revisit has returned.  It’s about revisiting the past, revising what I wrote, possibly editing it, because we all grow and change and that includes what we think about life with diabetes.  Plus, I find that I catch more typos if I edit my stuff months after I wrote it.  So inconvenient but better late than never!

This post is one of the most popular on this blog since I wrote it.  It’s obviously inspired by Stephen Covey’s book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”.  It’s one of my favorite posts because I reread it from time to time and it always helps me back on track.  That Stephen Covey is one smart guy.  So if you didn’t catch it the first go round, I’d be honored if you read it now and maybe give me your feedback on it…  Happy Wednesday!

Originally posted on February 13th 2010

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Diabetics

Diabetes Advocacy- A Call for Unity

ana3

I’ve heard many times that people have concerns over type 1 diabetes support dwindling.  At first I thought, can this be?  After all, there is more awareness now and more type 1 cases are being diagnosed each year.  This train of thought lead me to recount to my husband about the JDRF Walks that my family and I participated in over a decade ago.  I remember the walks being huge.  There were tons of people, over 6 miles of walking, police aid to escort walkers around the downtown of the city, ambulances available for low blood sugar crashes, snack and drink stops along the way, press cameras all over the place-in other words, I got the feeling there was A LOT of support for Type 1 Diabetes.  There was even a stage with a podium and the press would make a statement about what they saw.  My little brother was once interviewed for the news for being one of the youngest walkers.

Each year after the first walk, I couldn’t help but notice how the miles of the walk decreased.  When the walk eventually came down to under 3 miles, I thought it was “wimpy” and longed for the days where the walk was so long, one would actually have the appetite for the loads of hamburgers and hot dogs and side dishes provided post walk.  I was a teenager and began feeling like the walks were no longer being taken seriously.  Or maybe people were losing hope with every year.  I didn’t know what it was.

Yesterday, the city where I live held it’s JDRF Walk for the Cure.  I couldn’t make it.  It hit me yesterday morning like a lightening bolt that all of my strange symptoms from the last several weeks all point to a kidney infection so I am taking it easy, trying to down about 4 liters of water a day, and already left a urine sample at the doctor’s this morning.  Yesterday, my husband took the kids to the park before their nap and curiosity lead him to drive past the walk just as it was about to start.  We have a few areas in our downtown where large banner announcements often hang to announce a festival or walk for a cause.  He was surprised to see no banner about the JDRF Walk .  There is always a banner for the Cancer walks, the Strawberry and Peach Festivals, even the Greek Festival.  Those huge banners, strung between buildings are up for weeks and let everyone know about the event.  I consider it very effective marketing because of how small our downtown area is-everyone goes down that street sometime each month.

For the past two years I’ve been participating with the Diabetes Online Community.  I’ve been exposed to the the opinions of many with diabetes.  One idea that many have become concerned about is that the type 2 diabetes epidemic and the negative associations involved with that disease has leaked into the type 1 diabetes awareness arena.  Type 1 diabetes gets confused with type 2 and a lack of support ensues.  I’m sure there are other reasons for the dwindling support but I have heard plenty of negative things about type 2 and can easily imagine the negativity hurting the type 1 as well as the type 2 diabetics.

I’ve heard type 1 and 2 may require different cures and if that’s the case, you can see why this entire subject is an extremely complicated and emotional one.  Those with type 1 want acknowledgement that their life balance is a delicate one and one only successfully managed by an extremely exhausting way of living.  Those with type 2 are saying, “hey! This is really hard, too!”  And everyone is right.  And diabetes is a global issue, affecting everyone whether they have diabetes or not.  It’s just not seen that way, yet.

I have noticed many people only support one type of diabetes.  My concern however, is not about if this is wrong or right but rather, is this effective?  Is this in all of our best interests?  It worries me that type 1 not supporting type 2 will make type 2 look like a disease that is easy to deal with and easy to get rid of (when that isn’t the case at all).  It also worries me that type 2 not supporting type 1 will decrease funding and support for a much less prevalent disease.  Both scenarios lead to the same outcome-inadequate support for both types of diabetes.

It has become clear to me that helping dissipate inaccurate information about type 2 diabetes is not only the just and friendly thing to do, but one that will positively impact type 1 diabetes as well.  The type 1 community needs the backing of the type 2 community and vice versa.

Unity, in this case, as in so many others, is our best hope.  So although the two writers on this site, my sister Ana and I have type 1 diabetes, we support all people with diabetes (all 11 kinds!) and the causes that help any of them.  It’s always been this way but now we’re officially on the record.

What are your thoughts on the matter?

Can We Replace “Reverse” with “Remission”? and Other Thoughts

Courtesy of Graur Razvan Ionut

 

People don’t mean any harm when they say they reversed their diabetes.  They say it because that’s what the majority of the medical community uses and what they know to be true.  It’s not widespread that one can’t reverse diabetes.  In fact I’m looking for a doctor that will explain this to me.  So far, all the ones I talk to either say, “Yes, it can be reversed” or “I don’t know…”  It would be nice if we could use the word “remission” so that we had a way to describe those who reverse their symptoms and find themselves off of meds and with normal blood sugars.  We use this term in cancer patients, why not diabetes?

For some people, saying that they have reversed their diabetes is the logical way to put it.  They used to have high blood sugars but they changed the way they live and as far as they see it, they don’t have diabetes anymore.  I used to have a problem with my kidneys.  Test results would come back abnormal.  Now, test results come back normal and so I say I “reversed” my kidney damage (that’s what my doctor says, too).  That’s just the simple way that I see it.  And yet, I am aware that if I don’t manage my blood sugars, it’s only a matter of time before I see damage again.  Society has taken notice of how important lifestyle habits are and they assume it makes sense to say that if you live a certain way, you can keep diabetes away.  They just don’t know the details of the disease and good luck to you trying to teach them all the details.  People aren’t going to want all the details unless they feel diabetes really pertains to them.  If you try to get me to hear all the details about your favorite video game or your pet dog, I’m pretty sure I won’t remember them later.

I don’t understand when people say that diabetes is only cured if one can eat and exercise like a non-diabetic and have perfect blood sugars. The way I understand it, If you abuse the body, you run the risk of having serious problems. Metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, thyroid malfunctions…it goes on and on. People literally want to be able to eat the standard American diet and be well?  That’s simply not possible-at least not for long.  Those who argue that some people never get type 2 from this diet aren’t thinking big enough. This diet hurts everyone eventually. Maybe their genes offer some protection, maybe a lot! But eventually, the diet that so many eat in the US is very harmful and unfortunately, for an increasing number of people, it only takes a little of it to cause a problem.  And what if there were to be a cure for type 2?  People would want to eat as before and I doubt their bodies would hold up.

To me, the biggest problem is the fact that the media isn’t able to report on diabetes in a more multi-faceted and in-depth way.  If they did and people heard on CNN that type 2 varied from person to person, that the severity level could be minor to major and therefore some people could eat this and others found it didn’t work and some could be off meds and others could not, that some found success through just adding more exercise and others exercising all day didn’t find success and still needed meds, then I think the stereotypes would die down.  I think we should work on spreading that message.  Along with the message that type 1 and 2 are very different and that there are 11 types of diabetes (that we know of) so people should be aware that they can’t assume anything on some diabetic’s behalf-they’re bound to be wrong.  Maybe I’m dreaming but I think that if people were to hear this on the news they’d think, “Ohh ok…I didn’t know that.”

Focusing so much on how inaccurate the phrase “reversing diabetes” is hinders us, not helps us.  I think this because people explain that diabetes can’t be reversed by saying there is no cure and that once you have it you always have it-and I don’t hear doctors making that message clear at all.  So when we talk without any back up from the medical community we don’t get the attention we deserve.  Kind of like if I claim something without showing a study to back it up.  Why would anyone believe ME when I say that diabetes cannot be reversed?  I think that we need to seek clarity from the medical community and demand they set each other and the media straight.  We need their help to define the truth and to help us spread the word that diabetes cannot be cured, just put into a temporary remission in some people’s cases.  Also, to include that it is a progressive disease, getting worse over time.

A lot of people rant over this issue with a little too much disrespect, too.  It flies over the blogosphere and makes us sound even less credible than might already be to the general public.  Why would we attack people’s ignorance?  That’s a recipe for disaster.  Another thing we do that doesn’t work is exaggerate the truth.  One thing I’ve read a lot is that most type 2 diabetics are thin. This hurts us because suppose people go to the book I have here published this year by the ADA where it says that “three-fourths of all people with type 2 diabetes are or have been obese.”  That’s the majority.  So if we say that the majority are thin we’ve just lost credibility with people.  Trying to stop one myth in it’s track with one of the other extreme is not the way to go.

Instead we should be honest and do our best to give statements that leave people with the information that type 2 varies very much person to person.  We should set the example on how we want to be treated.  It sounds like Elementary School but over time I’ve realized that although it’s tempting to give people a short, simple, and informative answer, we simply can’t do that with a complicated disease.  We are going to have to take up more of people’s time or we are going to have to do something like this:  Next time someone says “If only type 2 diabetics would eat better and exercise more, they would be able to get off meds” we could say “That may be the case for some people but not for everyone because diabetes varies so much.  You know, maybe if the government used it’s money for fruit and vegetable subsidies instead of corn, beef, and tobacco subsidies, people would be able to afford healthier food.”  In other words, emphasize that “it varies” and then let’s remind people of one of the roots of the problem.  If we had better preventative care, if we all had easier access to fresh, healthy foods, if we didn’t have to tempted by a liter of soda being cheaper than a head of lettuce, maybe then more of us would eat better.  Everyone knows that’s true, they just need to be constantly reminded so that the bitter sentiment surrounding our health care crisis doesn’t get thrown onto those of us with the disease.

Part of our constant message should be that no one with diabetes should be blamed.  Compassion and understanding should be our focus because a lack of compassion breeds hurt and anger.  Then people take the hurt and anger and lash out illogically at those of us who are struggling with a disease or those of us with the disease lash out on ourselves in self destructive ways.  It’s a cycle we don’t want to continue living with.  And that’s why I think that it’s not as simple as telling people diabetes can’t be reversed.  It’s as complicated as explaining that it varies a lot, is very progressive, and that it’s mere presence is an indicator of how badly we need a cure and of how many things need to change in our society so that we can all be healthier.

Should Type 1 Diabetes Get a New Name?

Do we want to go down this road?
Courtesy of Nuttakit

 

People with diabetes of all types, help me out here, I’m on the fence.  Should type 1 diabetes get a new name?  I have been thinking about the pros and cons and feel I’m coming up short.

The benefits of a name change could stem mostly from the likelihood that people would start to learn more about “this new type” because media would report on the name change.  Also, having a different name would give type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes an automatic distinction and separation from the other.  Perhaps another benefit would be the psychological effect of type 1 and 2 diabetes having very different names.  Doctors and everyone else might find this easier when learning about diabetes and therefore not assume that one type of diabetic is the other type.  

Then there are the cons to this and believe me I’m aware of a few.  Would support and funding for a cure and advancement get hindered by this separation?  If people don’t identify with each other as people with diabetes, do they no longer ban together for their cause?  My worry is that they wouldn’t.  Granted, many people already support their type of diabetes exclusively and the information circulating about a cure being required for each type only supports this behavior.  This is not everyone’s case, however.  Another downside might be educating the public.  Let’s face it, it takes years to get new information to spread.  When people in the US started learning about stevia as a healthier replacement for splenda, people in other parts of the country and in other countries nearby were just learning that splenda was this new and wonderful diet accessory.  I’ve witnessed this first hand.  I would be concerned with it taking years to educate those in rural America about this change.  I know that where I live, a term like “eco-friendly” is just now getting more talked about.  Whereas in California, people were going nutty over this a decade ago.  So I see this as a realistic issue. 

So maybe we should just support some sort of educational campaign to get information to the masses about the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes and the fact that there are many other types as well.  Or maybe we should get a new name.  Like I said, I’m totally on the fence on this one. 

So what do you think?  What are some pros and cons to type 1 diabetes getting a new name?

#HAWMC Feces Transplant Helps Pre Diabetics?

 

 

You say "mmm" your belly says"nooo"        Photo by Simon Howden
You say “mmm!” your belly says”nooo!”    Photo by Simon Howden

 

 

I’m still participating in Health Activist’s Writers Month Challenge!  And today’s post prompt is to find a ridiculous headline or news about a cure for our disease and write what we think about it.  I had to read this article so I went ahead and read about the entire thing-not just the headline.

I found this:

Feces Transplant Helps Pre Diabetics With Insulin Sensitivity

For real.  And honestly, besides the cringe inducing factor-this makes sense.  We read more and more about how there seems to be a possible connection between type 2 diabetes and an imbalance in the gut.  Too much bad bacteria over the good bacteria caused from too much of the wrong foods or a sensitivity or allergy to certain foods.  This bacterial balance in the gut is SO important.  So when feces containing a better blend, so to speak, of good bacteria and bad bacteria, were transplanted into other men’s bowels (eww, I know) the men (who were obese and pre-diabetic) experienced improved insulin sensitivity.  They didn’t lose weight, however.  Yet, we know that many overweight people do not get type 2 diabetes.  There are other factors at play for sure.  And I think this study just helps to support that.  Many with type 2 diabetes are at a healthy weight.  With this study it’s too early to really tell anything but it’s certainly interesting.

Also interesting is it was suggested to me by a doctor that I give my newborns probiotics during their first few months of life to possibly minimize their diabetes risk by strongly supporting the healthy bacterial balance in their bellies.  And even now I try to watch out for foods that promote bad bacteria over good bacteria just in case it helps.  It’s one of the main reasons I limit processed foods and desserts with a lot of sugar.  I hope we learn more about this soon, don’t you?

One last question.  How did they find willing participants for this study?

National Diabetes Alert Day 2011

final_web_button_7_14_10

Today, March 22nd is National Diabetes Alert Day.  The CDC says one in four Americans has diabetes and doesn’t know it.  This is the diabetes worse case scenario.  Education and awareness are the only tools to begin helping someone who has diabetes but doesn’t know it.  Here is a link to the National Diabetes Education Program’s diabetes risk test which anyone can take.  It’s available in Spanish there as well.

We need to help spread the word about diabetes symptoms and risk factors because undiagnosed diabetes is the worst kind to have.  Once diagnosed, lifestyle changes and appropriate treatment can begin and not only can a person start feeling better, they can prevent all sorts of complications or at least slow down their progression. 

This is also a wake up call for those who have diabetes.  We don’t want people to lose hope.  We want  people to know that they can live a great life with diabetes.  This involves taking diabetes seriously and working closely with your doctor.  The first step in managing your diabetes is to acknowledge it, not ignore it.  If you’ve been told you have diabetes, don’t ignore it.  Learn about it and take control of your health.  You can do it.  You can feel better and you can greatly improve your future.  Make the decision today, to meet your diabetes head on.  Check out online diabetes blogs to find out how people with all types of diabetes are living wonderful lives with diabetes, one day at a time.

Spread the word to your friends and family.  Diabetes is increasing it’s prevalence and we all need to be aware of the risk factors and symptoms.

If you don’t have any symptoms but have a family history of diabetes, you also cannot lose hope.  Your genes do not typically have control over 100% of your outcome.  Your actions carry a lot of weight, too.  Learn about lifestyle changes you can make to delay or prevent diabetes.  It’s very much worth a try :)

Learn more here:

National Diabetes Education Program Website

American Diabetes Association Website

Copyright © 2017. Powered by WordPress & Romangie Theme.